Exciting One Story News
from Hannah Tinti

os200xDear One Story Friends & Family:

For the past fourteen years, it’s been my privilege and honor to be the Co-Founder and Editor in Chief of One Story. It’s hard to believe how far we’ve come—from the brilliant idea Maribeth Batcha came up with and then shared with me in 2001, to a zine the two of us cranked out of our apartments, to eventually evolving into the award-winning magazine and non-profit organization we are today. One Story started as a labor of love, but with a lot of hard work and a bit of pixie-dust, we’ve become a permanent fixture in the literary landscape, with over 15,000 readers, an expanding educational wing and a sister magazine, One Teen Story, to inspire the next generation of readers and writers.

I’m so grateful to the authors who have trusted us with their words, to the volunteers and members of our staff (past & present) who have helped us grow, and to the amazing members and subscribers who have supported us so enthusiastically, in person and online. You’ve all helped One Story expand our horizons and kept us moving forward. Although the future can sometimes be intimidating, we continue to believe that reading and writing stories is a vitally important experience, to better understand the world around us as well as our own interior lives. Maribeth and I are dedicated to One Story and what it stands for. We also know it’s a good idea to shake things up every once in a while, in order to see what else we’re capable of, and find new ways to thrive.

In the spirit of that kind of change I have some exciting news to share: In 2017, I’ll be publishing a new novel, one that I’ve been working on for the past six years. In order to properly launch this book into the world, I’ll be taking a sabbatical from some of my duties at One Story. I’ll no longer be running the day-to-day operations of the magazine, but I’ll remain on the board, and continue to be active in areas of content and education. Starting on Dec. 1st my new title will be Executive Editor.

Taking over the helm as Editor in Chief will be author and editor Patrick Ryan. Maribeth and I are extremely excited to be expanding Patrick’s role in our organization, as he’s become a vital part of One Story’s community, coming to us first as an author (we published his story, “So Much For Artemis” back in 2005), and later as an editor, when he joined our staff from Granta to become a contributing editor for One Story and Editor in Chief of One Teen Story. I’m confident that One Story is going to be in very good hands, and I hope that you’ll all enjoy getting to know Patrick more and welcome him as he takes this step forward.

One of the questions I’ve been asked the most over the past fourteen years is how I balance editing with my own writing. The truth is simple: I’ve been able to pursue my creative projects because of our amazingly talented staff at One Story. I couldn’t take this sabbatical without their full support. So before I temporarily bow out, I’d like to express my sincere gratitude to Maribeth Batcha for helping me find a way to take this much-needed break. She is both the brains and the beating heart of the magazine, the best partner-in-crime I could ever hope for, and she will continue to brilliantly direct all things One Story while I’m on the road. I’d also like to thank our board, supporters, volunteers and interns, as well as Devin Emke, Lena Valencia, Will Allison, Karen Friedman and Ann Napolitano for lending their super-smart and capable hands, and especially Patrick Ryan for agreeing to take the editorial chair. I know he’s going to bring the magazine (and all of us) to some fantastic and exciting new places.

You’ll be hearing from Patrick and Maribeth over the next few days about their plans for the coming year. In the meantime, I hope you’ll wish me luck, and save me a dance at the 2017 debutante ball!

Cheers,

Hannah Tinti

 

Changes at One Teen Story

One Teen Story is changing! Read on for a note from Maribeth Batcha, our Executive Director, with the details:

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Dear Friend,

Every four years at One Story we take some time to think about our programs and publications and plan for their future. It’s like the presidential election season, but with friendlier debates and fewer yard signs.

The last time we completed this process, in 2012, we launched One Teen Story. Since then, this little publication has published stories by both teen and adult writers side by side. We’re so proud of both, and have been honored to work with so many writers of all ages.

But these teens we’ve published are AMAZING. We’ve seen how much this success means to them, and have come to understand how few venues they have for publishing work that both adults and teens read. We have therefore decided to make One Teen Story a magazine that only publishes teen writing.

Starting in 2017, all issues of One Teen Story will be written by authors between the ages of 13 and 19. To find these stories we will run a teen writing contest from January to April 2017. We hope you will spread the word far and wide.

To allow these teens a longer time in the spotlight, the magazine will go from monthly to quarterly. And to give them the widest audience possible, One Teen Story will be sent to all One Story subscribers as well as to One Teen Story subscribers. This means that nearly 15,000 readers will read each and every story, and that One Story readers will be introduced to the amazing work being done by the next generation of short story writers.

One Teen Story will continue publishing adult writers through the end of this calendar year. Subscribers will be able to keep their One Teen Story subscription or switch over to receive One Story as well. We’ll be sending a letter out in the next few weeks that will explain all of the options.

We have, as of today, closed submissions of One Teen Story to writers above the age of 19. If you have a submission in our system, know that it is being read and considered for one of our final issues of 2016.

We hope that you are as excited about these changes as we are. And, if you are a teacher or someone who works with teen writers, please send an email to me directly and I’ll add you to our list of people to alert about submissions and our contest.

We’ll have more news about the change as we get closer to January 1st, but until then, thanks for all your support!

Maribeth Batcha
Executive Director

Four Distinguished Stories in Best American Short Stories 2016

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We’re very excited to announce that Best American Stories 2016 named four One Story stories in their “Distinguished Stories” section. You can read interviews with the authors and excerpts from the stories on our website:

One Story issue #204: “The Pole of Cold” by Erika Krouse

One Story issue #207: “Safety” by Lydia Fitzpatrick

One Story issue #211: “The Elephant’s Foot” by Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes

One Story issue #212: “When in the Dordogne” by Lily King

Congrats to Lydia Fitzpatrick, Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes, Erika Krouse, and Lily King!

One Story Workshop Day 5: Magnet Boards & Family Dinners

Dear Readers: Over this past week, One Story hosted our 7th annual Summer Workshop for Writers. Our current interns, Michelle, Jess, Coryna and Kally have been chronicling each day here on our blog, giving a peek into what we’re doing at the Old American Can Factory in Brooklyn. Our final write up is by Coryna Ogunseitan. Thanks, ladies, for writing up these great posts!–HT

One Story staff poses on the final night

One Story staff poses on the final night

After hours and hours of writing, reading, listening, and learning, One Story’s Summer Workshop has come to an end. The last day of the week began as usual; students were now familiar with the routine, and those who got to the Canteen early snacked and chatted with familiar friendliness. Most were thinking about the reading to take place later that evening, discussing what work they might share and different reading techniques. Students whose pieces were yet to be discussed were eager finally to showcase their writing in the morning’s workshops with Patrick Ryan and Will Allison.

After lunch, everyone gathered for Ann Napolitano’s craft lecture, which she referred to as “more of a TED Talk”. If what she meant by “like a TED Talk” was that her lecture would be more than inspiring, the comparison was spot on: Ann told workshop students about techniques by which they could process the world in order to become better writers. She advised everyone to pay attention to their internal “calibrated magnet” – inside each and every one of us is a particular set of traits or experiences that make us attracted to certain subjects or ideas. There are the best things to write about, the things that stick. Ann gave examples that ranged from the noble (like motherhood, the paramount theme in Anna Solomon’s reading Thursday night) to the grotesque (Ann once met a writer who was obsessed by newspaper articles about dead babies). She stressed that everyone who intends to write should be deeply familiar with what sticks to her magnet board, explaining that it is easy for mainstream tastes to overwhelm individual tastes when we let pop culture dominate most of our thoughts.

To illustrate each individual’s unique perspective, Ann revisited photographs she had asked students to take of “something that catches your eye”. There were sunsets, dead birds, funny notes, and dogs. She then asked everyone to write a sentence about each of five photos. When everyone read aloud, it became even clearer how particular each writer’s tastes were: while some described the image they saw in front of them, others cracked jokes and still others introduced first-person narrators. Ann emphasized that what sets a writer apart is not only what she sees in the world, but how she sees it.

After the lecture and exercise, students took a break for the afternoon. Many went to practice for the fast-approaching reading, and joked about how many glasses of wine a writer should have before getting on stage. It hardly seemed that any time had passed when writers returned, dressed up with heels and well-practiced stories, ready to culminate the effort and learning of the week.

Although many readers confessed to being anxious, no one’s nerves were obvious: everyone read smoothly and confidently from a selection of work as varied as the group itself. A vasectomy, turduckens, and being home alone were among the many rich subjects addressed. Workshop students received their fellow writers’ work, some serious, some humorous, with laughter and enthusiasm.

Once the reading had ended, the relieved students settled into their seats around the giant table set for 29 people, and, over a delicious dinner made by Runner & Stone, talked about the highlights of their weeks. As the evening winded down, everyone exchanged phone numbers, eager to keep in touch with other writers whose vision and criticism participants had appreciated. We ended the night with laughter and song, after Hannah announced that we were all now part of the One Story family.

One Story Workshop Day 1: Subvert Expectations

Dear Readers: This week One Story is hosting our 7th annual Summer Workshop for Writers. Our current interns, Michelle, Jess, Coryna and Kally will be chronicling each day here on our blog, giving a peek into what we’re doing at the Old American Can Factory in Brooklyn. Today’s write up is by Michelle Hu. Enjoy!–HT

WSDayoneHuzzah! One Story’s seventh annual Summer Workshop for Writers has begun. Writers arrived at the Old American Can Factory and began Sunday night with a cocktail reception, filling the floor with excited and nervous conversation. The room quickly became boisterous as more names were exchanged and glasses of wine and beer were consumed. Students were introduced to the One Story team and their instructors, our own Patrick Ryan and Will Allison, in preparation for the week ahead, where they’ll be attending morning workshops, craft lectures, and a variety of panels on the business of publishing. After a friendly welcome, the students went on a tour of the can factory, and visited our office, where they heard about the creation of One Story from its co-founders, Maribeth Batcha and Hannah Tinti.

The first official day of the conference began the next day with morning workshops, where Patrick and Will led in-depth discussions on stories and novel excerpts from each student. A growing familiarity between writers became apparent in the lunch that followed.

Afterwards, students gathered for the first of the Craft Lecture series with author Myla Goldberg, who began with a brief announcement about the subjectivity of writing (even after it is published). Myla focused her lecture on creating a space that allowed for productive disagreement. Lauren Groff’s “L. DeBard and Aliette,” an unusual love story that takes place in a time of illness, became an avenue to explore how Groff develops the relationship between the writer and the reader. Students took Myla’s invitation to explore ambiguity and disagreement in the story.

Reading, a process between the writer and the reader, is not one-sided, and the goal, Myla said, “is to foster collaboration with just the right amount of information.” In the lecture, students explored the ways Groff’s intentional choices create that mutual experience. The story, written in present tense, gives the characters’ experiences a real life immediacy. The choice to divulge certain details non-sequentially, however, allows her to not alienate the reader but challenge their ability to read about difficult topics. Similarly, the exclusion of details also contributes to the collaborative experience. Myla discussed the way Groff writes about sex through exclusion and how that creates moments that are at once delicate and also provocative. In what Groff chooses to not disclose, the reader is given an active role in how they experience and what they fill the moments with.

To end the lecture, Myla told the students how she makes space for writing and gave some advice. In summary: Writing is play! She reminded us that writing began before we were given the words for it. The creation of imaginary lives and worlds started with our childhood vividness. In wide arm gestures, Myla told us that writing is as active and away from the page as acting. Get an empty room, she says, and physically act out what the character is doing, grimaces and laughter alike.

Another way of looking at writing as play is through something Myla mentioned earlier in her lecture: “Subvert the expectation.” A line that applies to the hesitation most writers feel. When beginning to write it is crucial to remember to play, to subvert, and to undo expectations. She left us all with the reminder that writing is undoing as much as it is doing. But above all else, it’s fun.

After an afternoon social break with snacks and drinks, the day ended with an informal “Meet the Instructors” conversation, moderated by One Story Publisher Maribeth Batcha. Patrick Ryan and Will Allison discussed and answered questions about how they started as writers and gave some tips for the submission process. As lightening and flood warnings briefly distracted the students, it seemed as if even the weather was fortifying the duality of a writer’s life. While some took the opportunity of the thunder storm to continue talking to their peers after the event, others hugged their bags and sprinted through the river-ed streets with their heels kicked high.

Believe This

“You are interesting. Your imagination, your perceptions, your emotions are interesting. What is closest to you is valuable for your art. Believe this.” Those are the words carved into the tombstone of Jerome Stern, one of the greatest writing teachers I ever had. When I read this quote—which I keep over my desk—I can still hear his voice and feel his determination to inspire others.

patrickI never could have written the nine stories in my new book, The Dream Life of Astronauts (or had the courage to revisit and revise them over and over again) if it weren’t for this kind of support from people like Jerome, who not only helped my sentences get stronger on the page but showed me the importance of being a part of community that values reading and writing.

With that in mind, I’m excited to share some of my own encouragement—with YOU—in One Story’s first-ever, online Book Class: Learning from The Dream Life of Astronauts.

A book class is a private, online book club—with perks!—for both readers and writers.  Sign up today (or any time between now and August 1st) and I’ll send you a signed, first-edition copy of The Dream Life of Astronauts. In addition to the book, you’ll also gain access to a three-day, interactive class where you’ll get the chance to chat with me directly, as well as fellow readers and writers. We’ll take an intimate look at the evolution of this story collection, I’ll share my ups and downs, and I’ll also give tips that will help you start to assess your own writing, with an eye towards turning that drawer full of manuscripts into your very own book one day.

In addition, the class will feature a special, bonus story of mine called “The Real Ones,” which isn’t included in The Dream Life of Astronauts but features the same setting and atmosphere.

I hope you’ll join me. The class runs from August 4th – 7th. Sign up here, and I look forward to seeing you there!

Lena Valencia new Managing Editor of One Story

LenaOne Story is absolutely thrilled to announce that Lena Valencia will be joining us as our new Managing Editor.

Lena Valencia has held positions at A Public Space and BOMB Magazine, and served as a bookseller and events coordinator at The powerHouse Arena. Her writing has appeared in StoryChordBOMBThe Masters Review, and elsewhere. She received her MFA in Fiction from The New School and hosts the HiFi Reading Series in Manhattan. You can find her on Twitter at @lenavee.

Please join us in welcoming Lena to the One Story family!!

One Story Literary Debutante Ball 2016: The Pictures!

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Our 2016 Literary Debutantes & their mentors!

Thanks to everyone who came out to our Literary Debutante Ball in Brooklyn on May 6th. We heard inspiring speeches by Joshua Ferris and Mentor of the Year Jim Shepard, ate delicious food, mingled with publishers, editors, readers and writers, toasted with beer from Brooklyn Brewery and cocktails from Tito’s Vodka, and danced the night away with the Blue Vipers of Brooklyn and DJ Reborn. Most important, we celebrated the first books of One Story’s 2016 Literary Debutantes: Brian Booker (Are You Here for What I’m Here For?), Kim Brooks (The Houseguest), Matthew Cheney (Blood: Stories), Charles Haverty (Excommunicados), Cote Smith (Hurt People), and Naomi Williams (Landfalls). Here’s some pictures to remember that special night. Enjoy!

Introducing 2016 Debutante: Cote Smith

Hurt PeopleOn May 6th, at the 7th annual One Story Literary Debutante Ball, we will be celebrating 6 of our authors who have published their debut books over the past year. In the weeks leading up to the Ball, we’ll be introducing our Debs through a series of interviews.

This week we’re chatting with Cote Smith, author of One Story issue #118 “Hurt People” and the novel of the same name. The novel Hurt People expands on his short story, told from the point of view of a child living in the prison town of Leavenworth, as he idolizes his older brother, grapples with his broken family, and obsesses over the pool in his apartment complex—which is where the two brothers meet a mysterious stranger. Like the original short story, Smith’s novel is both grounded and suspenseful—true to its protagonist’s point of view yet imbued with poetry and tension. It’s a tricky balancing act that Smith pulls off with grace.

Jesse Hassenger: Where were you when you found out your first book was going to be published? How did you celebrate?

Cote Smith: I was at home playing a video game on the couch. I couldn’t pause the game, so I helplessly watched as my guy got slaughtered while my agent told me my dream was coming true. I celebrated by hugging my wife when she got home. We might have gone to the local brewery.

JH: I heard that your book took sort of an unusual path to publication. What was that experience like for you as a first-time novelist?

CS: The book was rejected the first time around. I thought it was dead and began working on another book, writing 200 pages before my future editor called and revived Hurt People from the dead like Lazarus. Everything since that moment, even the difficult and scary stuff, like editing, has been amazing. I’m lucky to have worked with such an amazing agent, editor, and everyone else at FSG.

JH: Hurt People is a full novel version of your One Story piece, also called “Hurt People.” What made you decide to expand the piece into a novel, and what was that process like?

CS: I knew there was much more to the world that I wanted to explore. The short story only covers the brothers and the mother, and gives just a glimpse of Leavenworth. Having grown up in the area, I was very familiar with that world, and yet had never seen a prison town portrayed in a story or movie, at least not from a child’s perspective. I thought it was a story that deserved to be told.

JH: A fair amount of the dialogue in this book is between the two kids—brothers—and that dialogue drives such an important relationship. What did you do to get into that mindset?

CS: I’m a younger brother, so getting into the mindset came fairly naturally, particularly the ideas of the younger sibling idolizing the older, wanting to do whatever they do, and remaining loyal no matter what.

JH: Another small thing among many that I love about this book is the way it captures the way some kids can be absolute obsessed with swimming pools. Were you pool-obsessed as a kid? Any vivid pool-related memories you’d care to share as summer approaches?

CS: I was obsessed. My uncle had a pool with a diving board, and my brother, cousins, and I spent entire summers inventing crazy pool moves and games. We had a floating volcano that we used to play king of the mountain, where one person sat on top and the others catapulted at them from the diving board to knock them off. We strung a hose through pool noodles and had a person on each side of the diving board hold the line so we could compete in an ad hoc high jump contest. Looking back, I’m surprised no one was hurt.

JH: As a movie nerd, I have to ask: are the VHS titles you use in Hurt People real? I know I could probably Google this but I’d love to hear about your selection process—either in terms of choosing real movies, or in terms of making up movies.

CS: The VHS titles are not real, but they were very fun to write. They’re based on the terrible horror and sci-fi movies we watched as kids, movies like Critters, Ghoulies, and the entire Leprechaun series. Like the brothers in the book, we watched these movies when we were far too young. We would take turns laughing hysterically in the light, when we were together, and being completely terrified when it was dark and time for bed. It’s all fun and games until you’re trying to fall asleep.

JH: So if Lieutenant Lazarus doesn’t exist, can you maybe get a development deal have it made so I can check it out?

CS: I’m on it.

JH: What are you most looking forward to at the One Story Literary Debutante Ball?

CS: This will be the second time I’m a debutante, so I’m assuming there’s some sort of special jacket, or at least a pin, that Hannah will present to me. I’m really looking forward to that.

Introducing 2016 Debutante: Naomi Williams

Landfalls coverOn May 6th, at our 7th annual Literary Debutante Ball, One Story will be celebrating 6 of our authors who have published their debut books over the past year. In the weeks leading up to the Ball, we’ll be introducing our Debs through a series of interviews.

First up is Naomi Williams, author of One Story issue #131 “Snow Men” and Landfalls from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Landfalls is a kaleidoscope tale of the ill-fated expedition of the ships Boussole and Astrolabe, which set sail from France in 1785 in an attempt to circumnavigate the globe and map the unknown parts of the world. The voices that populate the novel speak from locations visited along the journey—from the ports left behind, settlements visited, and journeys by dogsled across continents, and each chapter creates a new world, driven by individual desires and conflicts but all reflected in the larger story of the exploratory endeavor. Williams’ masterful narration pulls us into the individual lives affected by the voyage, but the expedition itself remains the central character as those lives intersect and diverge across the globe, and we arrive at the final page with sense that we, too, have gone on a great journey and are still yet a long way from home.

Torrey Crim: Where were you when you found out your first book was going to be published? How did you celebrate?

Naomi J. Williams: Hm. I’m not sure when that moment was. I do remember where I was when I learned my agent, Nicole Aragi, had agreed to take me on. It was early morning, and I was checking e-mail over my tea, which is what I always do first thing after I wake up, and there was her “yes” e-mail. My husband had just left for work, but I ran to the garage and he was still there, so I told him, and then we both cried a little. The book then went to auction, and that was very heady in its way, but I relayed the decision to go with FSG over the phone, and then I’m pretty sure the rest of my day went as originally planned—bugging my oldest child, a high school senior then, about college applications, and my younger one about homework, then enjoying a dinner that my husband probably made. Perhaps I had an extra glass of wine that night.

A few weeks later, though, before I’d seen a dime for the book, I did celebrate by shutting down my small private tutoring business. I was a good tutor, and fond of most of my students, but whereas I’ve always loved teaching classes, especially college classes, I never really enjoyed one-on-one tutoring, which often involved trying to cajole a few sentences out of children who didn’t like to write and didn’t want to be there. Once I knew the book was coming out, the tutoring became intolerable. That was a good day, when I sent out my “Dear Parents: I have some good news and some bad news….” e-mail.

TC: Landfalls is a dense collection of experiences all influenced by the Lapérouse expedition; crew members, scientists, family members left behind, inhabitants of the places the expedition visited. What was the first seed of this story for you? How did you decide to tell the story this way, from all angles?

NW: The idea for this book came from an old map that my husband gave me many years ago. It was supposedly an 18th-century map of San Francisco Bay but turned out to be a map from the Lapérouse expedition of a bay in Alaska. (That bay is the setting of “Snow Men,” the story that appeared in One Story in 2010.) I started Googling the expedition, which I’d never heard of before. The idea for the structure of the book—a series of stories or chapters, each set in a different part of the expedition and told by a different narrator or group of narrators—sort of came to me in a flash, either that first day or shortly thereafter. I’d always liked nautical fiction and stories about explorers, but I didn’t want to write another story that centered around the great white captain and his exploits. I wanted to mess that up a little bit and include voices we don’t usually hear.

TC: One of my favorite chapters is “Dispatches,” which follows Barthélemy de Lesseps as he crosses Russia. He’s cut off from the knowledge of what his former crew-mates are going through even as he makes a perilous journey of his own; we’re able to see the story as a whole, even though he can’t. It seems that some of the pleasure of historical fiction is that the reader always knows a little more than the character; for instance, that the French Revolution is brewing while the explorers are away from home. What drew you to this particular voyage and this particular historical moment?

NW: It was pure chance that drew me to this particular voyage, as I describe above, but I think it fascinated me right away—and continued to fascinate me for the decade I spent working on the book—in part because for its time, the expedition was quite progressive. It wasn’t about claiming land for France or about extracting gold or about missionizing people in faraway places. While the ships were charged with looking for economic opportunities for France, its primary goals were scientific and cartographic. A delegation of scientists and artists accompanied the expedition. Even the chaplains were also naturalists. It was also very high-tech for its time. And yet those Enlightenment ideals and idealism and advances didn’t really protect them in the end. I was really interested in exploring that. I’m so glad you liked “Dispatches,” by the way. I’m quite fond of that chapter myself.

TC: Can you talk about how research influenced the writing of this book? Did you find that research opened up how you thought about the novel or did it create unforeseen roadblocks?

NW: I love doing research. I have a lot of faith in the creative possibilities that open up when you combine artistic curiosity with scholarship. I veered from the historical record as little as I could—not because I thought that was my “job” as a writer of historical fiction, but because that was the challenge I set myself; it was just more fun that way. I never saw the research requirements as roadblocks. On the contrary, when I felt a little stuck in a particular story or chapter, I often found that doing more research would suggest something that lit the way forward. Of course, one can do too much research. I often had to tell myself to just stop already and start writing. Enough fussing about with what people ate in the 18thcentury or how they dressed or the obscure backstory of someone who never even makes an appearance in the novel! So yeah, in that sense it could present a roadblock. Because researching was always easier and more fun than writing.

TC: “Snow Men” was published in One Story in 2010, and the story makes up a chapter of Landfalls. Did you already know where it stood in the novel? How did having that story published change your writing life?

NW: “Snow Men” was the third piece from the book to find its way into print (the other two had appeared in “American Short Fiction” and “A Public Space”). I already knew where it would be in the book, but it had been a difficult story to write, and I was aware of some risks I was taking by adopting the point of view of a young native Alaskan girl. She’s one of the few characters in the novel who is entirely fictional, yet I felt a great obligation to her to get her as “right” as possible. So the piece’s appearance in One Story was an enormous shot in the arm.

TC: What are you most looking forward to about the One Story ball?

NW: Oh, I love parties and I love dressing up. My life in a laid-back Northern California college town affords me relatively few opportunities to do either. But contrary to the usual stereotype about introverted writers who find other people exhausting, I love being around people—new friends, old friends, the works. I can’t wait.