Jim Shepard on Book Tour!

Jim_ShepardJim Shepard is a One Story author, Sirenland teacher, National Book Award Finalist, winner of the Story Prize, and now, he has a new book out, The Book of Aaron, and is going on tour! In a starred review, Kirkus called The Book of Aaron “Understated and devastating. . . . an exhaustively researched, pitch-perfect novel exploring the moral ambiguities of survival [in which] ordinary people reveal dimensions that are extraordinarily cruel or kind.” And Roddy Doyle said: “Jim Shepard has written some of the best books I’ve read and The Book of Aron is his best.” Now’s your chance to see this incredible storyteller in person. Here’s the list of where and when he’ll be heading this May/June:

Odyssey Books — SOUTH HADLEY, MA
Reading with Robin McLean
Thursday, May 14

Harvard Bookstore — CAMBRIDGE, MA
Reading/Signing/Q+A
Friday, May 15

Newtonville Books — NEWTON, MA
In Conversation w/ Amy Hempel
Saturday, May 16

Peck’s Plate (with Greenlight Bookstore) — BROOKLYN, NY
Dinner with Jim Shepard
Sunday, May 17

Franklin Park Reading Series (with Electric Literature) — BROOKLYN, NY
Monday, May 18

Dallas Museum of Art — DALLAS,TX
Anthony Doerr and Jim Shepard: Compassion and Catastrophe
Tuesday, May 19

Brazos Bookstore — HOUSTON, TX
Reading/Signing/Q+A
Wednesday, May 20

Community Bookstore (with Brooklyn Public Library) — BROOKLYN, NY
In Conversation with Joshua Ferris
Thursday, May 21

3S Artspace (with RiverRun Bookstore) — PORTSMOUTH, NH
A Conversation with Jim Shepard
Friday, May 22

The Free Library of Philadelphia — PHILADELPHIA, PA
In Conversation with Daniel Torday
Thursday, May 28

Politics And Prose — WASHINGTON, DC
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Tuesday, June 2

Books & Books — MIAMI, FL
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Wednesday, June 3

McNally Jackson — NEW YORK, NY
In Conversation with Gary Fisketjon
Thursday, June 4

Bay Area Book Festival — SAN FRANCISCO, CA
In Conversation with Ron Hansen
Sunday, June 7

Vroman’s Bookstore — LOS ANGELES, CA
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Thursday, June 11

Powell’s Books — PORTLAND, OR
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Friday, June 12

Copperfield’s — SANTA ROSA, CA
Afternoon Literary Lunch
Saturday, June 13

The Booksmith — SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Saturday, June 13

Book Passage — CORTE MADERA, CA
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Sunday, June 14

Kepler’s — MENLO PARK, CA
Reading/Q+A/Signing with Tobias Wolff
Monday, June 15

Village Books — BELLINGHAM, WA
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Tuesday, June 16
Elliott Bay Book Company ( with Seattle Public Library) — SEATTLE, WA
In Conversation with…
Wednesday, June 17

Boswell Book Company ( with the Sam and Helen Stahl Center for Jewish Studies)
— MILWAUKEE, WI
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Thursday, June 18

Open Books — CHICAGO, IL
Lunchtime Reading/Q+A/Signing
Friday, June 19

Cuyahoga Public Library (with the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage and Mandel Jewish Community Center) — CLEVELAND, OHIO
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Tuesday, June 23

Lemuria Books — JACKSON, MS
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Wednesday, June 24

Square Books — OXFORD, MS
Reading/Q+A/Signing
Thursday, June 25

Parnassus Books — NASHVILLE, TN
In Conversation with Gary Fisketjon
Friday, June 26

Write a short story with Hannah Tinti!

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Crazy hat that I wear on our last day of class.

When I first started writing, I didn’t know how to tell a story. I had a lot of ideas, some descriptions, and strings of scenes that didn’t work together. My friends and family would read something I wrote then hand the pages back saying, I liked it. But I could see that they were not moved.

It wasn’t until I started studying and working with editors that I began to understand structure—how to bring shape and form to the page and use it to guide a reader through my fiction from start to finish. It was like someone had handed me an X-Ray machine. Suddenly I could see the backbone running through all of my favorite books and stories. So that’s how they did it, I thought. That’s how they made me feel this way.

Learning this technique changed the way I wrote. Now, I’d like to share it with you—while also having some fun. So let’s write a short story together! Through videos, power point presentations, online lectures, and message board discussions, I’ll lead you sentence by sentence, explaining each step along the way. At the end of the week—you’ll have a story with strong bones, ready to go wherever you want to take it.

This online class meets on your schedule. Each day, the next class will be automatically uploaded. You can log in any time to access the materials, watch my online “video lecture,” read advice on craft and form, and take the next step in our guided writing exercise. (You’ll be writing 5 sentences a day.) Have a question? Jump into the discussion boards and I’ll post an answer to the group. You’ll also be able to share your work with fellow students and connect with writers across the globe. If you fall behind—no worries!—all the class materials will be left up for an additional week for you to catch up.

Last summer, I taught this class for the first time—we had writers from all over the world, from Africa to Alaska, sharing their ideas and forming an online community. I hope you’ll join me for an entertaining and engaging week that will shed new light on your writing process.

Write a Short Story with Hannah Tinti will take place April 26-May 3rd. Deadline for sign up is April 23rd. For complete details and to sign up, go here.

Announcing One Story’s 2015 Mentors of the Year:
Toi Derricotte & Cornelius Eady, founders of Cave Canem

Cornelius.ToiOne Story is thrilled to announce our 2015 Mentors of the Year: Co-Founders of Cave Canem Toi Derricotte and Cornelius Eady.

At One Story, we strongly believe that being a part of the literary community should include helping others. In that vein, each year at our Literary Debutante Ball we honor established authors who have given extraordinary support to their fellow writers. Past honorees have included Ann Patchett, Dani Shapiro, Dan Chaon and Colum McCann.

Mentoring is the kind of work that happens behind the scenes, but is vital to keep the literary world alive and kicking. It comes in all forms—from teaching, to blurbs, to recommendation letters, to late-night reads, one-on-one conferences, career guidance, inspiration, and community building. Behind each book on the shelf are unseen mentors, giving an author the help they need to make their work better, to keep writing when they are ready to quit, and eventually that final push over the publishing wall, ensuring that new voices are heard.

Toi Derricotte and Cornelius Eady embody this commitment to mentoring. Together they founded Cave Canem in 1996 with the intuition that African American poets would benefit from having a place of their own in the literary landscape. Over the past 16 years, that intuition has become a conviction. In Cave Canem, emerging poets find sustenance, and a safe space to take artistic chances. The organization’s community has grown from a gathering of 26 poets to become an influential movement with a renowned faculty and high-achieving national fellowship of 344. In addition to an annual writing retreat at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, programs include two book prizes with prestigious presses; workshops in New York City and Pittsburgh; Legacy Conversations with such poets and scholars as Lucille Clifton, Rita Dove, Arnold Rampersad and Derek Walcott; a Poets on Craft series; nationally based readings and panels; and the publication of three anthologies: Gathering Ground: A Reader Celebrating Cave Canem’s First Decade, The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South, and Cave Canem Anthology XII: Poems 2008-2009.CaveCanem (308x320)

When Toi Derricotte shared with Cornelius Eady and his wife Sarah Micklem her dream of creating a retreat for African American poets, the three agreed to work together to make it a reality. While vacationing in Pompeii, they found a fitting symbol for the safe space they planned to create—the mosaic of a dog guarding the entry to the House of the Tragic Poet, with the inscription, “Cave Canem” (Beware of the Dog). In designing the logo for their new enterprise, Sarah introduced a telling visual metaphor by breaking the dog’s chain. Since inception, Cave Canem’s name and logo have stood for the culture-shaping role that the organization has played: a protection for poets and a catalyst for unleashing vital, new voices into the literary world.

We look forward to raising a glass to honor these two extraordinary writers & teachers, who have given so much support to the literary community on May 15th, 2015 in Brooklyn at the One Story Literary Debutante Ball.

Toi Derricotte has published five collections of poetry, most recently, The Undertaker’s Daughter (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011). An earlier collection of poems, Tender, won the 1998 Paterson Poetry Prize. Her literary memoir, The Black Notebooks, published by W.W. Norton, won the 1998 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Non-Fiction and was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Her essay “Beds” is included in The Best American Essays 2011, edited by Edwidge Danticat. Recognized as a Distinguished Daughter of Pennsylvania in 2009, her honors include the 2012 Paterson Poetry Prize for Sustained Literary Achievement; the 2012 PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry for a poet whose distinguished and growing body of work represents a notable presence in American literature; the Lucille Medwick Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America; two Pushcart Prizes; the Distinguished Pioneering of the Arts Award from the United Black Artists; the Alumni/Alumnae Award from New York University; the Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award from Poets & Writers, Inc.; the Elizabeth Kray Award for service to the field of poetry from Poets House; and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation and the Maryland State Arts Council. She serves on the Academy of American Poets’ Board of Chancellors and for many years was Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh. In 1996, she co-founded Cave Canem with Cornelius Eady.

Cornelius Eady was born in 1954 in Rochester, New York. He is the author of eight books of poetry, most recently Hardheaded Weather (Penguin, 2008). His Victims of the Latest Dance Craze (Ommation Press, 1986), won the 1985 Lamont Prize from the Academy of American Poets. He has collaborated with jazz composer Diedre Murray in the production of several works of musical theater, including You Don’t Miss Your Water; Running Man, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Drama in 1999; Fangs, and Brutal Imagination, which received Newsday’s Oppenheimer Award in 2002. He is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in Literature; a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry; a Lila Wallace-Readers Digest Traveling Scholarship; a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship to Bellagio, Italy; The Prairie Schooner Strousse Award (1994); and the Elizabeth Kray Award for service to the field of poetry from Poets House. With Toi Derricotte, he is co-founder of Cave Canem. He is Professor of English and the Miller Family Endowed Chair in Literature and Writing at the University of Missouri-Columbia

Introducing One Story’s 2015 Literary Debutantes!

One Story is thrilled to announce our 2015 Literary Debutantes:

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These 10 marvelous One Story authors have all published their first books in the past year. Their debuts will be celebrated on Friday, May 15, 2015 at the annual One Story Literary Debutante Ball. Each writer will be formally “presented” to the literary community, escorted by one or more of their mentors: established authors and/or editors who have helped make their first books possible. The One Story debutante ball will feature cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, live music and dancing. VIP tickets are now available. General Admission will go on sale April 1st.

Issue #201: All Lateral
by Matt Sumell

201-cover No one works 9-5 anymore. Instead we’re always working, often at more than one job. Most people I know have at least two, sometimes three or four sources of income, pasting together enough to pay the rent and the heating bill with a little left over for groceries and maybe a drink at the bar. Writers don’t often write about work, but in our new issue, Matt Sumell’s “All Lateral,” jobs are everything. The narrator in this wild, voice-driven story pumps gas at a marina and knocks out drywall, surrounded by a decaying landscape and haunted by the death of his mother. Frustrated and lost, he chooses to float—through his emotions and his choices— living on a boat with a dog named Jason. Thank goodness for Jason! And thank goodness for Matt Sumell’s “All Lateral,” which finds hope in the darkest corners. I hope you’ll check out Matt’s Q&A with us on how he wrote this moving, man-not-on-a-mission story, and then buy his collection, Making Nice, which Publisher’s Weekly said was “even more fun than eavesdropping in a confession booth” and “demonstrates an almost painful compassion for the sinner in most of us.” In the meantime, let’s raise a glass to all those sinners working past 5, and to dogs everywhere, scratching at the door, forcing us to go outside and notice the world.

Issue #200: A Party for the Colonel
by F.T. Kola

200-coverWhen Maribeth and I started One Story, our goal was to make it to 100 issues. Then in 2007 we did, publishing “Beanball” by the award-winning author Ron Carlson. After we sent his story to the printer, Maribeth and I caught our breath and looked at each other. We made it! Now what? Do we close the magazine? We thought of our loyal subscribers, our talented authors, supporters, and wonderful staff. All of these people had become dear friends, and together had formed not only a community, but a family of readers and writers. We needed to keep going, Maribeth and I decided. So we set a new goal: 200 issues.

Since then, One Story has become a non-profit organization. We’ve also expanded our family by creating a summer workshop, a membership program, and hosting our annual Literary Debutante Ball, so that our readers and writers can interact in person as well as on the page. With our new online classes, One Story has spread even further, reaching across the country and across the globe—Alaska to Africa, California to China, North Dakota to the North Pole. We’ve also launched a sister magazine, One Teen Story, to encourage and foster teenage readers and writers, so that our love of fiction and the short story can be passed to the next generation.

And now here we are at issue #200.

One of the rules Maribeth and I made when we started One Story was that we would only publish an author once. We wanted our magazine’s pages to be open to everyone, to bring a new voice to our readers with every issue, and ensure that One Story was always on the forefront of the literary scene, featuring the best established and emerging authors, side by side. Our past two stories highlight this mission: Issue #199, “And Then Someone Came From So Very Far Away” was written by the legendary Ann Beattie, winner of the PEN/Malamud and the Rea Award for the Short Story, while our new issue #200 is by a debut author, F.T. Kola. “A Party for the Colonel” is her first published story.

Set in South Africa in the 1970s, “A Party for the Colonel” explores Apartheid during a time of violent upheaval, with each generation seeking their own path to change. The Indian family at the center of this tale exists in a world that bars them from “Whites Only” hotels, restaurants and cinemas, but also puts them in a different class from their Black and Coloured (mixed race) African neighbors in Johannesburg. While the Colonel tries to raise the family’s status through acquiring wealth, his son joins the ANC and is held as a political prisoner. Caught between these two is the Colonel’s wife, and it is through her sorrow and fear for her child that F.T. Kola weaves this finely wrought story of hope and racial injustice.

Born in South Africa, F.T. Kola brings a unique perspective to this world-wide problem, while tugging at the reader’s heart with her remarkable prose. I hope you will read her insightful Q&A about how she wrote this story, and help me congratulate her on being One Story’s 200th issue.

Here’s to the next 100!

 

Issue #198: An Inventory
by Joan Wickersham

198.coverWhenever I’m feeling overwhelmed by life I make a list. Instantly I become calmer, as if by scratching out my ideas, tasks and responsibilities on paper, I’ve won half the battle. Our new issue, Joan’s Wickersham’s “An Inventory,” explores this same inclination for organization. In this charming story, a character (“you”) accounts for all of her romantic partners (even if that romance was one-sided), exploring the forces of attraction as well as the tender reaches of her own heart. Compiled chronologically, these brief anecdotes—with footnotes from the future!—become a marvelous meditation on love, faith and endurance. I was first introduced to Joan Wickersham while reading Best American Short Stories. Years later, working as a bookseller, I was thrilled to discover her wonderful novel The Paper Anniversary (and hand-sold many copies). Since then, I’ve kept track of her career and continued to admire her skillful carvings of emotional truth. Connections like this between a reader and a writer, that cover many years and many books, are why I got into the business of publishing, so it brings me particular joy to present “An Inventory” in our pagesI hope that all of you—our dear readers, writers, supporters and fans—will stop by our website to read Joan’s Q&A, and welcome her into the One Story family.

Issue #196: Meteorologist Dave Santana by Diane Cook

196-coverLet’s talk about sex, baby. Let’s talk about you and me. Let’s talk about all the good things and the bad things that may be.Salt-N-Pepa

If you grew up in the 90s, this song was probably played at your prom. Unless it was banned, that is—some parents and teachers found it too provocative (hard to believe given today’s celebrity sex tapes, nude selfies and graphic online porn). But at the time “Let’s Talk About Sex” was a fresh and candid take of women owning their libidos; enjoying sex while being smart about it. Salt-N-Pepa’s catchy chorus celebrated the joy of the physical, but each verse took things to a more serious level—discussing STDs and how sex can be incredible but also leave people feeling empty. With this song and others (like “Push It” and “Shoop”) Salt-N-Pepa made it OK for girls to like sex in an explicit way that hadn’t been done before. Rather than turning themselves into sex objects—they turned the tables and pushed the raw power of their sexiness out into the world. Our new story, “Meteorologist Dave Santana” by Diane Cook, takes this idea and runs with it, providing a lot of crazy, hot fun in the sack (NSFW, people)! But sex isn’t the only thing going on with Janet, Diane Cook’s fearless and headstrong heroine. Our story begins with a storm and Janet’s newfound obsession with the weather. Or, more specifically—the weather man, Meteorologist Dave Santana. Her focused and determined pursuit of Dave drives the narrative of this fascinating story, turning a crush into a fling and then a life-changing experience. Like all obsessions, the true story here lies not with the object of Janet’s affections, but why she was drawn to him in the first place—and then—why she can not let the idea of him go. Read our Q&A with Diane Cook to hear the inspiration behind “Meteorologist Dave Santana,” and how this story fits into her highly anticipated collection, Man V. Nature. Then dig through your old Salt-N-Pepa cassette tapes and bust out your best reverse running man. In the immortal words of “Push It”: This dance ain’t for everybody—only the sexy people!

Issue #195: Cool City
by Chuck Augello

195.coverHurricane Sandy happened almost two years ago, but its effects are still felt across New York City. I’ll never forget the way giant trees were thrown about like tinker toys, and the dread my neighbors and I felt as the Gowanus Canal broke its banks and started flooding sewage into the streets. As sections of the city were destroyed, and others left without power for days and even weeks, from Staten Island to Red Hook we were all shaken. Sandy was a reminder of how mother nature can bring civilization to its knees. That kind of chaos and randomness can be a frightening thing, so when Chuck Augello’s “Cool City,” appeared in our slush pile, I found myself both surprised and charmed by the way Augello took those same feelings of fear and uncertainty and spun them into a story about connection and love. Set during a terrible, Sandy-like storm, “Cool City” follows two young city-dwellers, each trying to cope with the randomness and terror of life. One uses numbers and OCD-like behaviors to make himself feel safe, the other uses “Fast Love”—a unique self-help program where love is broken down to an impulse decision followed by immediate, binding commitment. Be sure to read Chuck Augello’s Q&A with us about how he came up with the concept for “Fast Love”, as well as his decision to use Rainer Maria Rilke’s poems in “Cool City.”  I was moved and relieved when reading the final pages of this story, just as I was by the outpouring of volunteers and neighbors coming together in the aftermath of Sandy’s destruction. Like these two characters who fall in love during the chaos and wildness of the storm, when the rain finally stopped we found true comfort in each other.