One Story is FWR’s Journal of the Week

Fiction Writers Review, an exciting online literary journal by, for, and about emerging writers, has named One Story their inaugural Journal of the Week! In addition to saying a number of very nice things about OS (we’ll try not to blush too much), the article also features a great interview with our venerable Associate Editor, Marie-Helene Bertino (now a pro) who discusses everything from OS‘s role in the literary community to time capsules to the ever revolving playlist in the OS office.

Six Degrees of Celeste Ng: Asian American Edition

Welcome to the first (and perhaps last) round of Six Degrees of a One Story author. This week, I’m proud to showcase Celeste Ng (Issue #86, “What Passes Over”). And to make things more interesting I’ll be using only Asian American writers. Here goes:

6) For a number of well considered reasons (not including convenience), I chose to begin with the venerable Lan Samantha Chang whose second novel, All is Forgotten, Nothing is Lost (W.W. Norton & Co.) came out last year. Among other titles LSC holds, none might be as impressive as director of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, which leads us to…

5) …Nam Le. Though the OS author (Issue #93, “Meeting Elise”) is technically an Asian Aussie, for the purposes of this excerise I’m willing to claim him for the good ‘ole US of A. Especially due to the fact that before his breakout hit, The Boat (Knopf),  landed ashore the international literary scene, Nam spent his days in Iowa City ruminating over love and honor and pity and pride…and writing award-winning stories…

4) …like Don Lee, whose story, “The Price of Eggs in China,” won a Pushcart Prize six years before Nam’s “Cartagena.” Yes, that Don Lee, the author of the short story collection, Yellow (W.W. Norton & Co.), and the novels, Country of Origin (same) & Wrack and Ruin (same), who served as the principal editor of Ploughshares for nearly twenty years publishing such notable writers as…

3) …OS’s own Paul Yoon (Issue #58, “Once the Shore”). Paul’s story, “And We Will Be Here,” ran in the Fall ’07 issue of  Ploughshares, and was one of many publications that led to the release of his collection, Once the Shore (Sarabande), which was a finalist for this past year’s Asian American Literary Award in fiction along with…

2) …Nami Mun’s beautifully harrowing debut novel, Miles from Nowhere (Riverhead). That very same Nami Mun who worked as an Avon Lady and criminal defense investigator, who serves on the Advisory Board of Kartika Review, and who frequents the Asian American Writers’ Workshop (AAWW). But most importantly (to this particular blog post, at least), the same Nami Mun who earned her MFA from the University of Michigan just like the one and only…

1) Celeste Ng! Winner of the Hopwood Award in Graduate Short Fiction; TriQuarterly, Subtropics, and Kenyon Review Online contributor; Huffington Post blogger extraordinaire; and, of course, member of the One Story family.

Stations West named as finalist for the 2011 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature

Exciting news! One Story author Allison Amend’s (Issue #13, “Stations West”) debut novel Stations West (Louisiana State University Press), which Time Out Chicago says casts “a keen eye for the eccentricities of ethnicity, particularly at a time when lines were so clearly drawn, and so quickly crossed…” has been named a finalist for the 2011 Sami Rohr Prize in fiction for Jewish Literature. The prize, given to writers of “exceptional talent and promise in early career,” awards $100,000 to its top winner, with a $25,000 Choice Award given to its first runner-up. This year’s award ceremony will be held in New York City on May 31.

For more information on Allison and Stations West, check out her author website. And keep your fingers crossed. We know we will!

Reality TV Under the Microscope in Andrew Foster Altschul’s, “Deus Ex Machina”

We are thrilled to announce that One Story author Andrew Foster Altschul’s (Issue #62, “The Rules”) second novel, Deus Ex Machina (Counterpoint) has now officially hit bookstores.  Critics are gobbling up this “irreverently candid peek inside the entertainment industry”–Booklist. Stacey D’Erasmo, author of The Sky Below, calls it “Searing, riveting, shockingly smart, and imbued on every page with a wicked sense of humor…The tragicomedy of our time;” Publishers Weekly writes, “Rarely has societal critique come with more mayhem…an anarchic assault on the dehumanizing power of media;” and Rivka Galchen, author of Atmospheric Disturbances, says: “Deus Ex Machina manages simultaneously to be philosophical, absurd, kinda dirty, hilarious and, well, Real…Think Shakespeare’s The Tempest gone distressingly and wonderfully modern.”

For more information about the book, including tour dates, check out the author’s newly redesigned website. Or read more about Andrew and the making of Deus here in his recent PW profile.