One Story’s 2017 Mentor of the Year: Lan Samantha Chang

One Story is thrilled to announce our 2017 Mentor of the Year: Lan Samantha Chang.

At One Story, we believe that being a part of the literary community should include helping others. In that vein, each year at our Literary Debutante Ball we honor one established author with a “Mentor of the Year” award for their extraordinary support of fellow writers. Past honorees have included Ann PatchettDani Shapiro, Cornelius Eady, Toi Derricotte, and Jim Shepard.

Mentoring is the kind of work that happens behind the scenes but is vital to keep the literary world alive and kicking. It comes in all forms—from teaching, to blurbs, to recommendation letters, to late-night reads, agent advice, one-on-one conferences, career guidance and inspiration. Behind each book on the shelf is an unseen mentor, giving an author the help they need to make their work better, to keep writing when they are ready to quit, and to give them a boost over the publishing wall.

Lan Samantha Chang exemplifies this kind of gallant hard work, and we’ll be honoring her, along with our Literary Debutantes, on May 12th, 2017 at the One Story Literary Debutante Ball at Roulette in Brooklyn.  Sponsorship level tickets are available now. General Admission tickets will go on sale on March 20th.

Lan Samantha Chang, director of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, is the author of a collection of short fiction, Hunger, and two novels, Inheritance and All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost. Her work has been translated into nine languages and has been chosen twice for The Best American Short Stories. She has received creative writing fellowships from Stanford University, Princeton University, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Issue #225: An Oral History of the Next Battle of the Sexes by Lucas Schaefer

When “An Oral History of the Next Battle of the Sexes,” by Lucas Schaefer, showed up at the office and I gave it an initial read, I spent the first few pages having to remind myself that I was reading a work of fiction and not an actual oral history. Once I wrapped my head around that, I became drawn in by one of the biggest casts of characters I’ve ever encountered in a short story—each voice distinctive, each character a building block in the recreation of a historic (fictitious) event: the legendary 1974 battle between Holly Hendrix and Terry Tucker. The story is as compelling as it is funny, as infused with personality as it is charged with spot-on observations about the way we regard gender, power, and ambition. We’re delighted to be ushering it into the world, and we’re even more delighted that this is the first publication by a talent we are most certainly going to be hearing more from in the future: Lucas Schaefer.

To learn more about why Lucas chose to write a fictional oral history instead of a more traditional short story—and to hear what he has to say about the joys and challenges of that form—check out our online Q&A with the author. We make it standard practice to conclude our Q&As by asking authors to share the best piece of writing advice they’ve ever received. Lucas’s answer is both a charmer and heartbreaker!

Announcing One Story’s 2017 Literary Debutantes!

One Story proudly presents our 2017 Literary Debutantes:

SAVE THE DATE and raise a glass as we toast these nine One Story authors who have published their first books in the past year! The One Story Literary Debutante Ball will take place on Friday, May 12th at Roulette in Brooklyn, NY.  We’ll have live music, dancing, hors d’oeuvres, and specialty cocktails. It is our most important fundraising event of the year.

General Admission Tickets will be on sale March 20th. To discuss sponsorship opportunities for the One Story Literary Debutante Ball please contact: maribeth@one-story.com.

Issue #219: Switzerland
by Ann Patchett

219_coverI have been a fan of Ann Patchett’s writing since I first read The Magician’s Assistant. Along with her legions of fans, I have awaited each new book of hers with great joy and expectation, and it gives me ENORMOUS pleasure to have the chance to run a piece of fiction by Ann in our pages. This heartwarming tale of a mother and daughter re-connecting at a Zen Retreat moved me to tears. I know that you will all enjoy it, and I hope that you will also read Ann’s new book, Commonwealth. Contributing Editor Patrick Ryan brought this lovely tale to our shores, so I am turning the official introduction reins into his talented and capable hands. Be sure to check out our Q&A with Ann, where she talks about meditation, acceptance, and how to dial up the volume of pages when she’s writing.-HT


“Switzerland” is a story about a mother visiting a daughter who’s gone off to live at a Zen Study Center halfway around the world. It’s about a retiree diving deep into meditation for the first time in her life. And it’s about a parent reaching for her children long after both life and death have stepped in the way.

Whenever I read Ann Patchett, I discover something new about what great writing can do. More importantly, I discover something new about living. Joy, grief, regret, forgiveness, a grappling with the past and a hesitant embrace of the present—they’re all here.

We’re thrilled to be presenting you with this new story by Ann Patchett. Take a deep breath, clear your thoughts, and open your mind to the beauty of “Switzerland.”

Believe This

“You are interesting. Your imagination, your perceptions, your emotions are interesting. What is closest to you is valuable for your art. Believe this.” Those are the words carved into the tombstone of Jerome Stern, one of the greatest writing teachers I ever had. When I read this quote—which I keep over my desk—I can still hear his voice and feel his determination to inspire others.

patrickI never could have written the nine stories in my new book, The Dream Life of Astronauts (or had the courage to revisit and revise them over and over again) if it weren’t for this kind of support from people like Jerome, who not only helped my sentences get stronger on the page but showed me the importance of being a part of community that values reading and writing.

With that in mind, I’m excited to share some of my own encouragement—with YOU—in One Story’s first-ever, online Book Class: Learning from The Dream Life of Astronauts.

A book class is a private, online book club—with perks!—for both readers and writers.  Sign up today (or any time between now and August 1st) and I’ll send you a signed, first-edition copy of The Dream Life of Astronauts. In addition to the book, you’ll also gain access to a three-day, interactive class where you’ll get the chance to chat with me directly, as well as fellow readers and writers. We’ll take an intimate look at the evolution of this story collection, I’ll share my ups and downs, and I’ll also give tips that will help you start to assess your own writing, with an eye towards turning that drawer full of manuscripts into your very own book one day.

In addition, the class will feature a special, bonus story of mine called “The Real Ones,” which isn’t included in The Dream Life of Astronauts but features the same setting and atmosphere.

I hope you’ll join me. The class runs from August 4th – 7th. Sign up here, and I look forward to seeing you there!

Issue #217: The Woman in the Window

217-kindle_Page_01In our new issue, Joyce Carol Oates’s “The Woman at the Window,” two point of views are woven into a complex story of sex, violence, longing and connection. Contributing Editor Patrick Ryan took this unique piece through its paces, and so I am turning the introduction reins over to his steady and talented hands. I hope you’ll all read Joyce Carol Oates’s fascinating Q&A that tells how this piece began with a painting, and then became a poem, and is now a powerfully unnerving, voice-driven story that will grip you from the first page to the very last sentence.-HT

Paintings with people in them always suggest a narrative. Part of the fun of looking at, say, Vermeer’s “Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window” is wondering what the story is behind the image. Why does this pregnant woman reading the letter look so sad? Who is the letter from? Is it bad news? Maybe from the unborn child’s father? We can’t help but wonder about the context and start filling in the blanks. But it takes an imagination as colossal as Joyce Carol Oates’s to look at Edward Hopper’s painting, “Eleven A.M.” and create the story you’re about to read.

woman.in.windowIn the painting, a woman—naked but for a pair of high-heeled shoes—sits in a chair and stairs out through an open window. The woman seems to be waiting for something. The title of the painting tells us only the time of day. As Oates reveals in her interview with One Story, one of her starting points in writing about this woman is that she is forever trapped in her waiting; it is, forever, eleven a.m.

Waiting for what? Waiting for whom?

We’re honored to welcome Joyce Carol Oates into the One Story family, and we’re delighted to present to you “The Woman in the Window.”

Join me for a winter workshop!

PR May 2015 AltI published my first short story twenty-five years ago, and my love for writing and reading them has only gotten stronger over the years. One of the most important things I’ve learned is that honest, constructive feedback from others is an invaluable part of the process. With that in mind, I hope you’ll consider joining me for One Story’s winter workshop.

Regardless of whether you’re working on a second or umpteenth draft of a short story, this workshop will provide you with helpful criticism and set you on a path for revising. You’ll gain a deeper understanding of fiction’s inner-workings, get to offer your own feedback to other writers, and become part of a close-knit literary community.

The workshop will consist of ten students and will meet weekly on Thursday evenings (Jan. 7th-Feb. 4th)  from 7pm to 9:30pm at our office in Gowanus, Brooklyn. I hope to see you there!

About One Story’s next online class, and why character is its focus

PR May 2015 AltWhen I was sixteen, I had a wonderful English teacher who recognized my passion for writing and encouraged me to pursue it. On my portable Olivia, I would bang out a story about life on a submarine during World War II. I would bang out “chapters” of a detective “novel” set in the year 2750. I would bang out the “status report” of a fly assigned to follow a moose around Canada and report back to the other flies. “You have a good ear for sentence rhythm,” my teacher told me. “But why are you writing about this stuff?”

“What should I write about?” I asked.

“Go to the mall,” she said. “Take a notebook and a pen, and watch people, and listen to them, and write about them. Don’t worry about writing stories. Write vignettes.” (She had to explain to me what a vignette was.) “Just try to capture what they’re like.”

And that’s what I did. Some of those vignettes were half a page long; some were three pages. Some had dialogue (overheard); some had thoughts (imagined). They were plot-less, story-less. I wrote as many as twenty a week and showed each one to her, and she read them all and said, “Keep going.”

I had no way of knowing then that she was helping shape me into the writer I would be for the rest of my life: a writer who puts character above all other aspects of fiction writing, a writer who follows his characters and listens to them and collaborates with them as a means of creating short stories and novels.

For years, I’ve wanted to teach a class that focuses on character and how that one aspect of fiction writing is not only the spine of a story but the connective tissue that runs through every other aspect: setting, description, dialogue, point of view, even plot. And now it’s happening.

Please join me for From Character to Story: A Craft Intensive from October 1st-8th.

Through online lectures, exercises, videos, and message discussion boards, I’ll walk you through the tools in your fiction writing toolbox and show you how character is the secret to making the most out of them. At the end of the week, you’ll feel more confident about your ability to get into, explore, and finish short stories—all through the lens of character.

This online class will meet on your schedule. Each day, the next class will be automatically uploaded. You can log in any time to access the materials. Have a question? Jump into the discussion boards and I’ll post an answer to the group. You’ll also be able to share you work with fellow students and connect with writers across the globe. If you fall behind, no worries; all the class materials will be available to you for an additional week for you to catch up.

I hope you’ll take part in a fun and enlightening week that promises to breathe new life into you, your characters, and your writing process. The deadline to register is October 1st.

Introducing 2015 Debutante: Ted Thompson

steadyhabitsOn May 15th, at our 6th annual Literary Debutante Ball, One Story will be celebrating 10 of our authors who have published their debut books over the past year. In the weeks leading up to the Ball, we’ll be introducing our Debs through a series of interviews.

This week we’re chatting with Ted Thompson, the first of our debutantes to hail from our sibling publication, One Teen Story, and it happened in the most innocent way. Not long after his debut novel, The Land of Steady Habits, came out, Ted wrote a short story called “The Beasts of St. Andrew’s.” When his agent read it and said it was a very fine piece of young adult writing, this was news to Ted (who didn’t know he was writing YA). And when the story subsequently came across our desk at One Teen Story and we read it and loved it and offered to publish it, we had no idea that Ted had recently published his first novel with Little, Brown.

The Land of Steady Habits is not a YA novel. (You might flip to almost any random page to confirm this, such as the one where the main character, a husband and father in his early sixties, smokes PCP with a friend’s teenage son.) It’s a very grownup novel about a not-so-grownup man who has decided to turn his back on his marriage, his home, his life—only to find himself clumsily second-guessing his every move. We spoke to Ted about what it was like to write, revise, and publish a book about a character coming unhinged.

Where were you when you found out The Land of Steady Habits was going to be published? How did you celebrate? 

I found out the novel would be published on my 30th birthday. That may seem a little too tidy to be believed, but it’s how it happened. The problem was that I had been out the night before with some friends trying not to think about the fact that my book was on submission, and celebrating my impending birthday with a regrettable amount of boozy frozen drinks, so when the call came I was in no shape to celebrate the big news. In fact, I almost didn’t pick up the phone! I was still in bed, feeling awful. I think I faked my way through the call well enough, though I doubt I sounded as enthusiastic as I should have. It really wasn’t until the next day when I could process what exactly had happened. And I think I’m still processing it.

The main character of your novel, Anders, decides in his early sixties to dismantle his life. Part of the fun of reading the book is that we get to watch this dismantling layer by layer. As the creator/conductor/overseer, were you rooting for Anders the whole time, or were you also wincing now and then?

I can’t actually remember my earliest impulses with this book, but it’s probably safe to assume that when I started working on the book I thought I would be rooting for Anders’ destructive impulses. But it only took twenty pages of writing it to understand I was way more interested in the role that regret played in his life, and the fact that he’s continually drawn to the very thing he’s just rejected. So I’m not sure I winced for him so much as felt for him and his competing impulses. I suppose I’m always interested in a character’s shame.

Can you tell us a little about how different The Land of Steady Habits is from the manuscript your agent originally sent to your editor?

Oh gosh, it was a lot different. The major thing was that the novel was originally told from just one character’s point of view. It was all Anders, and we had no access to anyone else. So it wasn’t until I was nearly a year into my edits that I decided to try a major rewrite. I was stuck, and beginning to despair, when I thought “What if I just changed the rules of the novel, the basic physics of how the whole thing is put together?” To me, it wasn’t until I did that–opened up the point of view to other characters–that I was able to find the book’s structure.

Darin Strauss and others have compared this book to John Updike’s Rabbit, Run. Did that comparison surprise you? Would you list Updike among your major influences? And are there—just maybe—more chapters that might emerge one day in the story of Anders Hill?

They surprised me in that the comparison is both flattering and lovingly exaggerated. Darin was a teacher of mine and will be my mentor at the Debutante Ball, and his kind words were helpful for marketing the book. But while I admire the Rabbit novels to no end, the comparison is likely the most apt in terms of subject matter (that is, a domestic novel focusing on a male character of a certain social class with destructive impulses). It’s a tempting thought, writing more about these characters long after the events that this novel covers. I doubt I’d jump into that project anytime soon, but I suppose it’s best to never say never.

What are you looking forward to most at the Debutante Ball on May 15th?

I was fortunate enough to attend last year’s ball and I’m still thinking about the potency of that gin cocktail. So that’s one thing. But mostly I’m looking forward to meeting the other debutantes and celebrating how supportive One Story is to young writers (and also enjoying the fact that none of us has to give a reading).

Issue #199: And Then Someone Came From So Very Far Away
by Ann Beattie

cover_199It’s a thrill and an honor to publish award-winning author and short story master Ann Beattie in our new issue of One Story. “And Then Someone Came From So Very Far Away” made me hungry for pie (there are many delicious recipes in these pages). But it also made me wonder at Beattie’s skill on the page, exploring the simple events in our lives that can unseat our minds and unearth our secrets. One Story Contributing Editor & OTS Editor in Chief Patrick Ryan brought this marvelous piece to our shores, and so I’m turning the introductions into his extremely capable hands. I hope you all enjoy!-HT

There’s a phenomenon that occurs in an Ann Beattie story that always lets me know I’m reading an Ann Beattie story. The most apt comparison I can think of is that it’s a little like watching a Robert Altman film (when Altman was at the top of his game)—but in Beattie’s stories, instead of the characters all talking for their lives, they’re thinking for their lives. Even when we’re tethered to the thoughts of a single character, there’s a staccato of observations, conclusions, and second-guessing going on—all of it pinballing through outside stimuli.

In the case of “And Then Someone Came From So Very Far Away,” much of the outside stimuli arises from a farmers’ market. If you’ve spent any time at all in a busy farmers’ market and wondered at its bustle not just of commerce but of personalities, you’ll know what an accurate portrait of that environment Beattie has created here. And, more importantly, at the heart of this story is another portrait: Nona and Prue—two sisters in their later years, each trying to help the other out emotionally, and each doing a less than perfect job of it.

No proper introduction of this wonderful story would be complete without mentioning the pies. The pies! You’ll be entranced by the care and inventiveness Nona puts into her baking. You’ll smell the pies as Prue cradles them and boxes them up. And a little part of you—probably nestled in the pit of your stomach—will ache as those pies are bought and carried away by people who aren’t you. Still, “And Then Someone Came From So Very Far Away” doesn’t belong to the pies; it belongs to the sisters, both of whom I fell a little bit in love with.

We’re delighted to be publishing the legendary Ann Beattie. Be sure to read her Q&A with us about how she wrote “And Then Someone Came From So Very Far Away.” This story will both fill you up and leave you wanting more: more Nona, more Prue, more Beattie.