One Story Workshop Day Five: Last Day of Camp

flowers. (448x640)Our final recap is brought to you by Tony Wei-Ling. Thanks to all of the interns for their stellar work this week! We couldn’t have done the workshop without you. -HT

And so One Story’s Summer Workshop for Writers draws to its grand finale!

In the morning, Will Allison and Patrick Ryan taught their last workshops, giving editorial feedback to each student and answering any lingering questions they might have.

After lunch, our writers sat down for a nuts-and-bolts industry talk from One Story Editor-in-Chief Hannah Tinti, who discussed different ways to get out of the “slush pile”: the giant mess of unsolicited manuscripts that come through the doors of any magazine or literary agency.

Hannah began with simple presentation tips – how to make your submission fit industry standards and be kinder on the reader’s eyes and laptop. (The topic of writing cover letters made everyone anxious, but Hannah calmed us by walking us through a basic template.)

“Don’t overthink it,” she said. “The bio especially. Keep it simple and short. The first read, whether it’s for an agent or a magazine or a press, is almost certainly done by an assistant, an intern, or a volunteer. They are the first hurdle you must get over. So thank them for their time, and be courteous.”

More complicated, but less stressful, was Hannah’s advice on researching and submitting work strategically. “You want to find a place that publishes writing like your own, a magazine that matches your aesthetic. Most places – especially small presses – have a strong point-of-view.” The same went for agents: submit to people who represent writers you admire, authors you’d be comfortable “being in a line-up” with. Hannah didn’t just recommend doing research beforehand, but outlined how to do so, emphasizing the AWP conference and yearly anthologies as the best way to get to know the field.

That evening, everyone gathered one last time at the Can Factory for a (slightly nervous) cocktail hour before our student reading. But the nerves disappeared once each writer took the podium, or rather stage. Who knew introverted writers could be such good performers? Each student took on a different readerly voice and pace as they presented their work, which ranged from whimsical poetry to experimental short fiction to Borgesian existential horror.

Hannah broke up the reading with a brief tribute to her former teacher E. L. Doctorow, a literary giant who passed away this week. Then, to close out the evening, she was joined by instructors Will and Patrick, and together they sang/spoke a group campfire version of “Eye of the Tiger” on Hannah’s ukulele. When dinner arrived (gnocchi with fresh peas and mint, and casarecce with tomato, chard, and anchovies), we refilled our drinks and relaxed for a few final hours with new friends.

Goodbyes were difficult, and lingering. Many promised to meet up again, and to exchange manuscripts over coffee or drinks. It many ways it felt like the last day of camp. Everyone was tired but full of new experiences and new friendships.  “This isn’t goodbye for real!” people said as they hugged, “I’ll see you very soon.”

That’s it for the 2015 One Story Writers Workshop. We’ll see you next year!

 

One Story Workshop Day 4: Calvin Baker & the Writer’s Obsession

Calvin.Baker.OneStoryToday’s recap of our summer workshop is brought to you by Tony Wei-Ling.Enjoy!-HT

The fourth day of One Story’s Workshop for Writers was a marathon. We started our day with double workshop sessions with Will Allison and Patrick Ryan, followed by a meditative craft lecture on obsession and finding the themes in our own writing from Author/One Story Assistant Editor/Workshop Coordinator, Ann Napolitano.

Earlier in the week, Ann had asked all of the students to take a picture with their cell phones. During class, she projected each of these photos on a screen, and had the students use them as stepping off points for writing exercises. Together the group discussed how these pictures could unearth themes in their writing, by revealing what each author was “obsessed” with. Ann shared how over time in her own writing (of both successful and unsuccessful novels) she’s learned to pay attention to her obsessions and use them to guide her work.

“Some things are societal obsessions,” she told us. “Things trending on Twitter or among your friends and family, or in the literary world. We feel like we have to keep up with all of those trendy books, movies, shows, and you can fill up your life doing that.”  But that won’t feed our writing, Ann said. In fact what we should do instead is pay attention to what keeps us personally obsessed, what draws our eye and our attention. “Notice the patterns,” she said. “Notice what you notice.”

After a break spent exploring the neighborhood’s parks and pie shops, our writers reconvened at Park Slope’s Community Bookstore, where One Story author Calvin Baker  read from his new novel, Grace, and spent time answering questions about his writing process. (Meanwhile, the bookstore’s cat, Tiny, prowled the cheese plate.)

Calvin emphasized the trust a writer needs to have in her senses, her instincts, and her inspirations, and remembered a moment of pure creative energy that sparked the idea for his first novel (Naming the New World) upon a hilltop in rural Kenya. He stressed the need to travel and explore the world, and the importance of finding your own voice on the page. Together with One Story’s Editor in Chief Hannah Tinti, Calvin also discussed influences on his work, from the Bible to ancient mythology and philosophy.

“As a young writer, I decided to make a personal canon for myself,” he said. “And I recommend that to all writers: make the canon your own.”

Hannah agreed, and encouraged everyone in the audience to curate their own personal canon, choosing the authors that they love and the books they need to inspire their writing. She  added that she creates a reference bookshelf for each project she works on. “I’ve seen Hannah’s bookshelves, and they go up to the ceiling,” Calvin laughed.

Stay tuned for a recap of the last day of our summer workshop, including our group dinner and student reading!

One Story Workshop Day Two: A Guiding Light for the Rewrite

soap-operaOur daily update from One Story’s Summer Workshop for Writers continues! Today’s episode is brought to you by intern Tony Wei-Ling. Enjoy! -HT

Soap operas are maybe the furthest thing from the literary short story we can think of –low-brow, long-form, and commercial. But today, after intensive morning workshops with editors Will Allison and Patrick Ryan, followed by a healthy lunch, our students sat down for a craft lecture with One Story Contributing Editor Karen Friedman to discuss how soap operas can relate to the editing process.

With clips from Dallas, Guiding Light, and General Hospital, Karen walked us through how to revise our opening pages, and what vital info needs to be dropped in the opening paragraphs.

“As writers, we sometimes do ‘throat-clearing’ while we’re figuring out how to get from the first line to the rest of the story,” Karen said. “But openings need to quickly establish the main characters, where they are situated, and what the emotional situation is. If you don’t do those things in the first two pages, you’re missing your best chance to get out of the slush pile.”

Using clips that covered amnesia, evil twins, and ‘it was all a dream!’ surprise endings, Karen showed us how to approach rewrites with a big-picture plan, so that “editing” doesn’t just mean fiddling with the details. Everyone’s favorite clip was by far “The Slut of Springfield”–from a famous 1980s episode of Guiding Light–that Karen used to show “movement” within a scene. Reva and Josh are the characters. Some background: Reva and Josh were in love, but Reva married Josh’s father. Josh was so mad he got into a car accident and is now in a wheelchair. This scene happens at the end of a party. Josh starts off berating Reva, but she turns the tables on him.

It’s no wonder that Kim Zimmer, the actress who played Reva, won an Emmy for this scene!

In the evening the drama continued, as we enjoyed cocktails and cupcakes and chatted with three talented literary agents. One Story Editor in Chief Hannah Tinti moderated the official panel, beginning with the question that we all wanted to know but were too nervous to ask: “What the hell is a literary agent?” Our guests – Sarah Burnes, Jim Rutman, and Samantha Shea – had different answers. Primarily working as the intermediary between writers and publishing houses, literary agents play many roles, from finding and editing manuscripts, deciding when a book is ready for submission, finding the right editor, ironing out contracts, putting out fires as the book hits the shelves and sometimes playing “bad cop” in negotiations. Sarah Burnes cited the importance of the gut check in picking new writers: “It comes down to this question: do I feel this thing?” And Jim Rutman explained that he often corresponds with writers for a long time before he finds the right project to work on together. “A rejection is not always a ‘no.’ It can also mean ‘not this book, but maybe the next’ if the agent is encouraging and asks to see more.” Regardless of all the industry talk of pitches, query letters, and market trends, all the agents agreed – the text itself is the most important. “The writer I pick is the one whose manuscript I can’t get out of my head,” said Samantha Shea.

Tomorrow, we’re meeting with a panel of editors and listening to a craft talk from One Story author Seth Fried. Stay tuned for more secrets from behind the editorial curtain!