Issue #213: The Savior of Gladstone County by J.F. Glubka

cover_213Our next issue, “The Savior of Gladstone County” introduces an exciting new voice, J.F. Glubka. Contributing Editor Will Allison brought this marvelous piece to our pages, and so I’m turning the introduction reins over to him. I hope you all enjoy this story as much as I did. -HT

is the question faced by Henry Heinrich, the protagonist of J.F. Glubka’s “The Savior of Gladstone County” (issue #213).

When Henry discovers his gift, he doesn’t try to get rich. Or seek fame. Or resolve to save the world. In fact, he doesn’t do much of anything until a friend coaxes him into serving as an “angel” for the people of their rural community.

For Henry, though, being an angel isn’t all wings and halos. “By thirty-five his hair was white,” writes Glubka, “and he’d stopped hunting and fishing. He drank more and ate less. He’d stare at the TV with the sound turned down to a hush and the lights dimmed. Too much stimulation gave him headaches. He’d let the sweetheart he’d married at nineteen divorce him with hardly a protest.” Cheating death has drained the life out of Henry.

That all changes when he meets Francis Friday, an eccentric, young divorcee and the sister of a girl Henry once saved. Henry falls in love, and Francis falls for Henry too. The problem is, Francis is also in love with Henry’s gift. And as she begins to test the limits of his power, she sets in motion a chain of events that threatens to destroy more than just their relationship.

I hope you find “The Savior of Gladstone County” as riveting as we did. And be sure to check out our Q&A with J.F. Glubka to learn about his approach to supernatural subject matter, the best writing advice he has received, and how this story was influenced by his stint as a nighttime security guard in Portland, Oregon.

Issue #212: When in the Dordogne by Lily King

212-cover “Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them—in order that the reader may see what they are made of.”
I often quote this Kurt Vonnegut line to my students. It’s great advice for writers trying to create compelling fiction on the page. But as a reader, I sometimes find it hard to keep turning the pages as horrible events are heaped onto my favorite characters. I want them to have happy endings instead. This contradiction got me thinking about happiness as a literary device. It’s just as layered and complex as anger or hate, but authors often avoid it in their work. Why? I wondered. So I asked around. The truth of the matter seems to be this: happiness is really, really, really hard to pull off—in life, and in literature. Luckily, in our new issue, “When in the Dordogne,” we’re in the talented hands of author Lily King. Set over one magical summer, the story begins as a lonely boy is left in the care of two house-sitting college students. These young men are bristling with energy and joie-de-vivre, and in between raiding the fridge and cannonballing into the pool, they teach our boy lessons about friendship and love and finding joy that he carries with him for the rest of his life. Happiness is rare, and wonderful. When it comes, we must grab it with both hands. So read more about Lily King in her Q&A with us, and hold tight onto “When in the Dordogne.”

Issue #211: The Elephant’s Foot by Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes

211-coverGrowing up, I loved to read classic horror tales, like Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Monkey’s Paw” by W. W. Jacobs. There was something electric about the writing in those stories that shocked and disturbed, while also revealing dark, mysterious truths about human nature. A similar sense of touching a live wire came through the first time I picked up our new issue, Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes’s “The Elephant’s Foot.” Set in a Catholic School in the 1960s, this captivating story focuses on four young girls pushing the boundaries of their friendship and their imaginations after a mysterious object (an elephant’s foot!) enters their lives. Everything about the foot is extraordinary—from the wild stories about its origins to the way it haunts, then alters, each of the girls. Read Gabrielle’s Q&A with us to find out more about the inspiration behind this chilling tale, which arrives just in time for Halloween.

Issue #210: That Summer, ’53
by Victoria Redel

210-coverI’m writing this in the final moments of summer, which always feel both relaxing and fraught. I spend every minute I can outdoors, enjoying the last of the good weather, and at the same time, I wonder at how fast the days have gone by. Luckily, I have Victoria Redel’s remarkable story, “That Summer, ’53,” to help me remember the smell of BBQ cooking, the cool joy of jumping into a cold lake, and the lazy stretch of a summer night with friends, sipping drinks and watching the sun filter pink and orange through the trees. Set in 1953, this bucolic lakeside life is the American dream for Serge Solta and his young Russian family, their own little piece of Shangri-La. But things are more complicated than they seem in Serge’s work life and his marriage. The McCarthy hearings and the Rosenberg executions are broadcasting through everyone’s TV sets, and soon Serge finds himself caught between two worlds, muffling his misgivings with Seabreeze cocktails and the rhythm of Pérez Prado’s “Mambo Number Five” while trying to keep Shangri-La from slipping through his fingers. Check out Victoria Redel’s Q&A with us to hear the family history behind this sharply-turned tale. Then it’s time to get out your vintage cocktail shaker, fix yourself a Gin-and-It, open the pages of “That Summer, ’53,” and enjoy a literary Indian summer.

Issue #209: Things I Know to Be True by Kendra Fortmeyer

209-coverIn the 1960s my mother worked as a librarian in Brookline, Massachusetts. She still talks about how the building was a lifeline to the community there–not only for students and families but also for the elderly, the unemployed, the lost and the dispossessed. At libraries, people who can’t afford an education (or even a newspaper) have access to books from around the world. At the very least they can find quiet and shelter until the stacks close at night. Our new issue, “Things I Know to Be True” by Kendra Fortmeyer, explores the library as refuge through the unique voice of Charlie Harrison, a Vietnam vet struggling to tell the difference between fact and fiction. Charlie uses books to escape the visions in his head, but when an incident gets him banned from his local library, he must find a way to build his own stories, and eventually face the past he has been hiding from. In Kendra’s Q&A, she discusses the challenges of creating a point of view like Charlie’s, and how libraries have played a role in her own past (and future—as she is now in library school!). “Things I Know to Be True” is an important story about trauma, mental illness, family, and the power of words. I hope it will inspire some of you to dust off your old library cards. There is a whole world waiting at your local branch, and with any luck, a friendly librarian, who can put the right book into your hands.

Issue #208: Mothers, Tell Your Daughters by Bonnie Jo Campbell

It is an enormous thrill to be publishing Bonnie Jo Campbell in the pages of One Story. I’ve been a fan every since I read her collection, Women & Other Animals. Everyone should be pre-ordering her new book, which includes our current issue, “Mothers, Tell Your Daughters.” This marvelous tale inhabits a voice that will charm, shock, and ultimately haunt you.  With gratitude, I’m turning the introduction reins over to Contributing Editor Will Allison, who brought this wonderful writer to our pages. –HT

MTYD-cover (480x640)In our latest story, the narrator of Bonnie Jo Campbell’s “Mothers, Tell Your Daughters” (issue #208) is a tough woman—widow, mother of six, smoker, drinker, drowner of kittens, butcher of chickens and cows, breaker of horses, lover of men. But most of all she’s a talker; indeed, talking is, as Campbell puts it our author interview, “her great power.”

The problem is, this woman just had a stroke. She can hardly speak a word as she lies in bed in the old Michigan farmhouse her father built, cared for by nurses and her estranged daughter, Sis. “Now she can only try to explain her life to herself,” says Campbell. “Probably it’s what we all end up doing in the end.”

What this narrator has to say about her life might surprise you. She’s proud of the fact that she didn’t worry about her kids when she raised them. She doesn’t regret letting her husband and boyfriends beat her children. She refuses to apologize for allowing her kids to eat PBB and lead paint. And she doesn’t really like when her grandchildren visit. (What she’d really like, at the moment, is a jelly jar of elderberry wine.) As much as she wants to believe she lived her life right, however, she does have a few regrets, one in particular involving her boyfriend Bill Theroux and Sis. But if that sounds like the sort of regret you’ve read about before, get ready for another surprise.

We’re thrilled to present the title story from Campbell’s forthcoming collection; it features one of the strongest and most distinctive characters we’ve encountered in a long time—a woman you might come to love in spite of yourself, and a woman you definitely won’t forget. If you’d like to learn about the inspiration for this character—and find out which two words Campbell never uses in her fiction—be sure to check out our author interview.

Issue #207: Safety
by Lydia Fitzpatrick

cover_207One of my favorite school memories involves a giant parachute. Once a month, our gym teacher would unroll the colorful fabric. My class would stretch across the floor and play games, raising it up and down, catching the air. There was something magical about that moment, when we were all under the parachute together, and I remembered it vividly when I first read our new issue, “Safety” by Lydia Fitzpatrick. This finely-wrought tale explores a difficult subject: school shootings. The material might seem a bit daunting to some readers, but I will say now that if you do not open this story, you will be missing out on an astonishing accomplishment of suspense and point of view, that somehow turns a deplorable situation into a moment of courage, faith, hope and connection. Check out Lydia’s Q&A with us about how she explored her own fears while writing this compelling story. And when you’ve finished, you might find yourself thinking of your old gym teacher who always made you run extra laps, and the thrill of lifting a parachute over your head with the rest of your class. All those tiny hands making something enormous happen, with material strong enough to save lives, and still thin enough to let the light shine through.

Issue #206: Bursk’s Cutting Board by Scott Cheshire

issue206Nothing taught me more about the inner lives and desires of people than waiting tables. From the maniac chefs in the kitchen, to the customers demanding substitutions, to the bartenders passing around kamikaze shots, a restaurant is full of drama and bursting with energy. At the center of it all, of course, is the food that is being served. The pleasure of eating and the awakening of the senses. But what happens when a bite loses its taste? When a man whose entire life has been focused on cooking finds himself the one being cooked for? This is the dilemma in our new issue, “Bursk’s Cutting Board” by Scott Cheshire. As the narrator awaits what could be his final meal, he reminisces on his past and his marriage, sifting through his memories as the smell of his wife’s cooking winds through their apartment to the bedroom (now sickroom). Bursk has lost his appetite, and though he hides this from his wife, this loss intertwines with all his other regrets and fears. He worries: was he a good husband? He worries: what will happen when I am gone? In the end Bursk connects it all–his past, present and future—in a rousing speech that clutches at joy and salutes his hopes and dreams. I hope you’ll read Scott Cheshire’s Q&A with us on how he wrote this compelling and moving story, and also this interview where Scott discusses publishing his celebrated debut novel, High as the Horses’ Bridles, and what it’s like to be a One Story Literary Debutante. Until then, let’s all raise a glass to first books, and to great meals, and to the smell of garlic lingering on our fingers.

Issue #205: Tell Us You Were Here by Anne Valente

205-cover What haunts us isn’t always supernatural. Loss and regret can float through the dark the same as any phantasm, and they both come to roost in Anne Valente’s marvelous story, “Tell Us You Were Here.” Contributing Editor Karen Friedman took this piece through from start to finish, and so I’m turning the introduction reins into her hands. We’re thrilled that Anne will be one of our Literary Debutantes at the One Story Literary Debutante Ball on May 15th (get your tickets now!) for her collection, By Light We Knew Our Names (Dzanc Books), which Matt Bell called: “a striking debut, reminiscent of Aimee Bender and Lorrie Moore, but with a bright promise all its own.”-HT

Do you have a ghost story? I do. One night, when I was eighteen years old and crying in bed, the springs of my mattress compressed beside me and a hand touched my leg. This contact was the culmination of months of eerie activity in my room – mostly missing items suddenly reappearing and unexpected noises. Senior year had been rough. Within one week, my grandfather died and my parents announced their divorce. The ghostly hand on my leg was not menacing, but somehow caring. It freaked me out.

Our latest issue, “Tell Us You Were Here” by Anne Valente is all about ghosts and what beliefs become necessary for a person to survive. The story centers on an unlikely trio of women ghost hunters, each with her own reason for searching out proof of the unknown, each damaged in her own way. The women seek a ghost named Patience Worth, who in the early part of the 20th Century supposedly penned novels and plays through the medium (and actual historic figure) Pearl Curran.

The narrator, a non-believer and a geologist by training, has recently fled her adult life and returned home to St. Louis. She is working at a coffee shop by day and getting stoned in her parents’ basement every night. Anne expertly interweaves fact and fantasy, the narrator’s concrete knowledge of geology with a spiritual search in which proof is often elusive.

My daughter, too, looks for proof about the things she loves, but fears may not be real. Like Narnia. Or the Tooth Fairy. We’re careful to walk the line between honesty and her imagination. My practical side recognizes the flimsiness of my superstitions. But belief in a little everyday magic has made my life richer, given me strength, even been a comforting hand at a time when I needed it. So when my daughter asks, I paraphrase the old line about there being more things between heaven and earth than we can imagine. I hope, like the narrator in “Tell Us You Were Here”, that even in the face of overwhelming reason, the chance of what might be possible is enough.

For more on Anne’s historical inspiration and how her story developed, please visit our author Q&A. We hope to see you on May 15th in Brooklyn, where we’ll be celebrating Anne as one of our literary debutantes! Read an additional interview with Anne about publishing her first book here.



Introducing 2015 Debutante: Katie Coyle

vivianappleOn May 15th, at our 6th annual Literary Debutante Ball, One Story will be celebrating 10 of our authors who have published their debut books over the past year. In the weeks leading up to the Ball, we’ll be introducing our Debs through a series of interviews.

This week we have the pleasure of chatting with Katie Coyle, author of One Story issue #192 Fear Itself, and the debut Vivian Apple at the End of the World from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. When Vivian Apple discovers her parents are missing and two holes in the roof in their place, she sets out to get answers on a road trip across “post-Rapture” America with her best friend Harp and a mysterious boy named Peter. Vivian’s quest to find her parents brings her to larger questions about identity, belief, and growing up and highlights Katie Coyle as an exciting new voice.

Where were you when you found out your first book, Vivian Apple at the End of the World, was going to be published? How did you celebrate?

I was sitting on my couch, opening up my e-mail, after an aborted attempt at doing Pilates. I don’t know that I ever attempted Pilates again after reading that e-mail. I celebrated by taking a train downtown in the middle of the day to meet up with my husband, who was so crucial to me in getting the book written and out into the world. We ate cheeseburgers and laughed like idiots and later that night I’m pretty sure I got really drunk.

Your story “Fear Itself”, issue #192 of One Story, also revolves around teenage girls. Why did you decide to focus on teenage girls in both “Fear Itself” and the novel?

In both instances, it was extremely intentional. Vivian and the girls in “Fear Itself” are all dealing with the same fundamental problem, which is finding that their own wants and fears and personalities don’t seem to fit the cultural understanding of what a girl should be. This has been a fundamental challenge in my life, from my teen years until today, and I’m always fascinated by stories that touch on it. I’m really weary of the teen girl stereotype that persists in pop culture, all these ditzy and dramatic backstabbers. Having been a teen girl myself, having known so many teen girls, I’m interested in that space between the stereotype and the actual, far more complicated truth. The characters I write tend to be girls who have felt pressured to limit themselves, and then over the course of the story they inevitably snap, often in (to me) funny and compelling ways.

Throughout the book, Vivian is questioning her beliefs and religion. What inspired you to explore this?

I started writing Vivian Apple about four years ago now, shortly after a 2011 prediction from a man named Harold Camping that the Rapture and apocalypse were imminent. After his predicated date came and went and nobody seemed to have been raptured, I read an article about a family wherein the parents had believed Camping, had given him a lot of money and were anxiously anticipating being saved, and their teenage children were far more skeptical. The article was kind of jokey, but I thought the dilemma of the kids was a really powerful one. Not only were they setting themselves in opposition to these huge ideas about God and salvation, but they were taking a stand against their parents, too. I have always been interested in the way young people often have to reject the values of the generation that came before them in order to define themselves as their own autonomous individuals, and I saw a lot of potential in writing a story about a family divided along similar lines.

What are you working on now?

I’m trying to finish up a draft of my third novel, a fantasy—which is also and perhaps unsurprisingly about a teenage girl—before August, which is when I’m due to give birth to my first child.

What are you most looking forward to at the One Story ball?

I’m looking forward to meeting the other debutantes, who are all extremely talented and intimidating and good-looking. I’m also looking forward to snacks; I assume there will be snacks.