Issue #220: Where the Bees Are Going by Andy Holt

220_coverI always get excited when I see a writer trying something unexpected on the page. Well, get ready folks–this new story if FULL of surprises. Tying the collapse of bee colonies to the loneliness of those pushed to the edges of society, “Where the Bees Are Going” by Andy Holt will make you buzzzzzzz with excitement. Since Karen Friedman took this story through its editorial paces, I’m passing the introduction reins into her hands. In the meantime, enjoy! And pass the honey. –HT

In my early 20s, I moved to New York without a job and with very little savings. My roommate, an aspiring actress and high school friend, found us a cheap one-bedroom in Fort Greene. She was my only friend in Brooklyn, which seemed fine at first – there were drinks with producers and various “industry” people to fill the hours and I was always invited along. Then she left for a month to try pilot season in L.A. Without my friend, there were no nights out. I was trying to temp, but work was slow, so I spent three weeks alone in our apartment trying and failing to write. I lived on cereal. I read. I watched our 5 channels of network television. I listened to “Blood on the Tracks” so many times I can still sing the entire album from memory. I wished I’d never left home. Mostly, though, I waited for something to change.

Almost 20 years later that feeling of overwhelming inertia, the sense of being powerless to move beyond my circumstances, came back to me as I read “Where the Bees Are Going” by Andy Holt. Through the unexpected and captivating voice of bees, Andy explores the nature of loneliness and how we survive it.

Far from mindless drones buzzing around the backyard, the insects narrating his story are survivors of collapsed hives. They long for the homes they’ve left behind, navigating what it means to be thrust out into a world where the very basis of their survival, the hive, no longer exists. In their desperation, the bees attempt to create a home. This time one based not on conformity and duty, but rather shared need. Along the way, they learn from a species all too familiar with what it means to struggle in loneliness: our own. The bees find that their survival depends on a measure of grace, sacrifice, and compassion. I hope this story captures your heart and imagination the way it captured ours. After you read it, check out our online Q&A for more on how Andy created this memorable story.

And if like me, a latent bee obsession gets reignited, take a peek at this incredible art installation in London where you can step inside a gigantic metal hive and feel a bit of what it’s like to actually be a bee.

Issue #219: Switzerland
by Ann Patchett

219_coverI have been a fan of Ann Patchett’s writing since I first read The Magician’s Assistant. Along with her legions of fans, I have awaited each new book of hers with great joy and expectation, and it gives me ENORMOUS pleasure to have the chance to run a piece of fiction by Ann in our pages. This heartwarming tale of a mother and daughter re-connecting at a Zen Retreat moved me to tears. I know that you will all enjoy it, and I hope that you will also read Ann’s new book, Commonwealth. Contributing Editor Patrick Ryan brought this lovely tale to our shores, so I am turning the official introduction reins into his talented and capable hands. Be sure to check out our Q&A with Ann, where she talks about meditation, acceptance, and how to dial up the volume of pages when she’s writing.-HT


“Switzerland” is a story about a mother visiting a daughter who’s gone off to live at a Zen Study Center halfway around the world. It’s about a retiree diving deep into meditation for the first time in her life. And it’s about a parent reaching for her children long after both life and death have stepped in the way.

Whenever I read Ann Patchett, I discover something new about what great writing can do. More importantly, I discover something new about living. Joy, grief, regret, forgiveness, a grappling with the past and a hesitant embrace of the present—they’re all here.

We’re thrilled to be presenting you with this new story by Ann Patchett. Take a deep breath, clear your thoughts, and open your mind to the beauty of “Switzerland.”

One Story Workshop Day 5: Magnet Boards & Family Dinners

Dear Readers: Over this past week, One Story hosted our 7th annual Summer Workshop for Writers. Our current interns, Michelle, Jess, Coryna and Kally have been chronicling each day here on our blog, giving a peek into what we’re doing at the Old American Can Factory in Brooklyn. Our final write up is by Coryna Ogunseitan. Thanks, ladies, for writing up these great posts!–HT

One Story staff poses on the final night

One Story staff poses on the final night

After hours and hours of writing, reading, listening, and learning, One Story’s Summer Workshop has come to an end. The last day of the week began as usual; students were now familiar with the routine, and those who got to the Canteen early snacked and chatted with familiar friendliness. Most were thinking about the reading to take place later that evening, discussing what work they might share and different reading techniques. Students whose pieces were yet to be discussed were eager finally to showcase their writing in the morning’s workshops with Patrick Ryan and Will Allison.

After lunch, everyone gathered for Ann Napolitano’s craft lecture, which she referred to as “more of a TED Talk”. If what she meant by “like a TED Talk” was that her lecture would be more than inspiring, the comparison was spot on: Ann told workshop students about techniques by which they could process the world in order to become better writers. She advised everyone to pay attention to their internal “calibrated magnet” – inside each and every one of us is a particular set of traits or experiences that make us attracted to certain subjects or ideas. There are the best things to write about, the things that stick. Ann gave examples that ranged from the noble (like motherhood, the paramount theme in Anna Solomon’s reading Thursday night) to the grotesque (Ann once met a writer who was obsessed by newspaper articles about dead babies). She stressed that everyone who intends to write should be deeply familiar with what sticks to her magnet board, explaining that it is easy for mainstream tastes to overwhelm individual tastes when we let pop culture dominate most of our thoughts.

To illustrate each individual’s unique perspective, Ann revisited photographs she had asked students to take of “something that catches your eye”. There were sunsets, dead birds, funny notes, and dogs. She then asked everyone to write a sentence about each of five photos. When everyone read aloud, it became even clearer how particular each writer’s tastes were: while some described the image they saw in front of them, others cracked jokes and still others introduced first-person narrators. Ann emphasized that what sets a writer apart is not only what she sees in the world, but how she sees it.

After the lecture and exercise, students took a break for the afternoon. Many went to practice for the fast-approaching reading, and joked about how many glasses of wine a writer should have before getting on stage. It hardly seemed that any time had passed when writers returned, dressed up with heels and well-practiced stories, ready to culminate the effort and learning of the week.

Although many readers confessed to being anxious, no one’s nerves were obvious: everyone read smoothly and confidently from a selection of work as varied as the group itself. A vasectomy, turduckens, and being home alone were among the many rich subjects addressed. Workshop students received their fellow writers’ work, some serious, some humorous, with laughter and enthusiasm.

Once the reading had ended, the relieved students settled into their seats around the giant table set for 29 people, and, over a delicious dinner made by Runner & Stone, talked about the highlights of their weeks. As the evening winded down, everyone exchanged phone numbers, eager to keep in touch with other writers whose vision and criticism participants had appreciated. We ended the night with laughter and song, after Hannah announced that we were all now part of the One Story family.

One Story Workshop Day 4: Take a Moment to Celebrate

Dear Readers: This week One Story is hosting our 7th annual Summer Workshop for Writers. Our current interns, Michelle, Jess, Coryna and Kally will be chronicling each day here on our blog, giving a peek into what we’re doing at the Old American Can Factory in Brooklyn. Today’s write up is by Michelle Hu and Coryna Ogunseitan. Enjoy!–HT

Anna.Cat

Even Community Bookstore’s resident cat is entranced by Anna Solomon’s new novel, LEAVING LUCY PEAR

Today at the Summer Workshop, writers powered through their fourth day, packed with morning workshops taught by Will Allison and Patrick Ryan, Hannah Tinti’s lecture on getting “Out of the Slushpile” and attending Anna Solomon’s launch of her newest book, Leaving Lucy Pear at Brooklyn’s own Community Bookstore.

Although “Out of the Slush Pile” suggests a more pragmatic lesson than an inspiring one, Hannah continued the pattern of lectures this week by reminding us all that writing is hard loving and loving hard. She asked the audience to try as best as they can to separate the writing process from the publication process. The room filled with a gentle silence as they were told that “not being published doesn’t mean you’re not a writer.” Writing is about the heartbeat, about authenticity. Publication is a business hat, one you wear when the sun gets too hot.

Hannah then began her talk, quickly breaking up the process into three digestible parts: preparing your work, compiling a list of places to send, and hearing back.

PREPARATION: The formalities of hard and digital submissions were laid out in specific details from fonts (Patrick’s favorite is Garamond) to email follow ups. A specific pet peeve, one shared by many editors, is page numbering (always number the pages).

SENDING (short stories to magazine): Hannah sited Best American Short Stories, The O’ Henry Prize Stories, and the Pushcart Prize anthologies as great ways of finding which publications are gaining attention. In general when submitting, one should consider the magazine’s reputation and circulation. It’s also nice to be paid.

SENDING (manuscripts to agents): When looking to query literary agents, Hannah cautioned writers to do their research. As explained at the Agents Panel on Tuesday night, the writer/ agent relationship is a more delicate one determined by compatibility between persons and ideas. Agents’ qualifications are not determined by who they are but the people they know and the books they represent. It is important to be more selective in how many you submit to at once (preferably less than 5), and the specificity of your address to them, noting any familiarity with their work or other points of connection.

HEARING BACK: After breaking down submissions and providing tips for cover letters, Hannah talked to the group about acceptance and rejection. Through example letters, writers reviewed the different tiers of rejection and learned their varying significance. A rejection is not a hard No. The coded hints (the inclusion of their name, a story title, or a personal note) help writers better understand the spectrum between yes and no. “The editors are having a conversation with you,” Hannah said. By being able to decipher their cues, writers can begin to talk back.

Later on in the evening, writers reconvened a few blocks away, at the Community Bookstore for Anna Solomon’s launch of her new novel, Leaving Lucy Pear. The bookstore’s cat purred and listened intently as Anna began reading from the opening chapter, describing a young woman, Bea, leaving her baby in a pear field, then watching behind a stone wall as another woman, Emma, picked up the baby and adopted her as her own. During the Q & A, moderated by Hannah, Anna not only talked about her revision and writing process, but talked candidly about her ideas of motherhood, growing up Jewish, and her hometown of Gloucester, Massachusetts.

During the event, as we listened to and celebrated with Anna Solomon, understanding all the labor and the love she put into creating Leaving Lucy Pear, we were reminded of what Hannah said about acceptances in her afternoon lecture. “When one comes your way, stop and celebrate.” Acceptances are rare, and sometimes, their importance isn’t easily understood by family or friends. “So take a moment,” Hannah said, “and feel exactly what you feel. Raise a glass with some fellow writers. They are the ones who will truly understand how hard you worked to make this happen.”

One Story Workshop Day 3: Find the Action in Your Story

Dear Readers: This week One Story is hosting our 7th annual Summer Workshop for Writers. Our current interns, Michelle, Jess, Coryna and Kally will be chronicling each day here on our blog, giving a peek into what we’re doing at the Old American Can Factory in Brooklyn. Today’s write up is by Kally Patz and Coryna Ogunseitan. Enjoy!–HT

Victor

Victor LaValle talks about ACTION!

Alice Munro and the Brothers Grimm may not appear to have much in common. Aside from, of course, their enormous talent, the writers are stylistically very different. But today, they were two of four celebrated authors on the syllabus for Victor LaValle’s Craft Lecture. After students finished two hours of rigorous workshopping with Patrick Ryan and Will Allison, and enjoyed a delicious lunch prepared by Runner & Stone, we all gathered in the Canteen to take a closer look at ACTION & PLOT.

LaValle began by drawing our attention to a key element of storytelling that, despite its simplicity, is overlooked by many literary writers: present, physical action. He said that when he was an MFA candidate at Columbia, no one ever asked the basic question, “Are your characters doing anything?”

One Story workshop students then read aloud, popcorn-style, three of the stories LaValle had assigned and broke them down according to action, like a comic strip. For each new action, LaValle drew a new box, inside of which he wrote no more than two or three words. (For example, “Mike walks,” or “Mike gets lost.”) The exercise helped the students visualize each story, as they might a movie script, highlighting action as something concrete, progressing step by step. LaValle encouraged breaking down our own stories–and the stories of authors we love–in this same way, to see how the physical action relates to the overall meaning of the piece.

According to LaValle, what was important was that readers and writers alike were able to see why each action was “justified.” He cited a beautiful moment in Alice Munro’s story, “The Bear Came Over the Mountain,” when the protagonist, suffering from dementia, is leaving her home to move into an assisted-living facility, and erases the mark a “cheap black house shoe” left on the floor. Not only is she permanently leaving the home in which she lived most of her adult life; she is erasing what LaValle called “the last trace of herself.” Workshop students left the class talking about the Munro story, many intending to reread it at home looking for intentional, meaningful action.

Some One Story workshop students snuck off to nap—we mean write!—but most stuck around to hear Hannah Tinti and Ann Napolitano’s advice on giving a good public reading, in preparation for open mic on Friday. Students took notes as Hannah and Ann shared tips on getting over the jitters, then tried out their new skills with a classic author used by orators young and old: Dr. Seuss. We were feeling inspired and composed this short tribute in preparation for the evening’s Book Editor Panel:

Big press
Small press
Old press
New press.
This one has a bestseller.
This one treats new authors better.
Say! What a lot
Of editors there are.

Indeed, there were a lot of book editors in the Can Factory last night. The panel, moderated by One Story’s Managing Editor Lena Valencia, included Sarah Bowlin from Henry Holt, Brinda Ayer from Restless Books, Yukia Igarashi from Catapult, and Margaux Weisman From William Morrow/Harper Collins. (Unfortunately, we couldn’t work all of this into the “One Fish Two Fish” syntax.)

The editors started off by talking about how they got into the publishing industry. According to Margaux, the secret is to work 72 jobs and spend your free time hunting down literary agents. There was some nervous laughter in the room, but she assured us that wasn’t a joke.

Things cheered up a bit when the editors talked about what gets them excited. Sarah told us about how she got the rights to Sheila Heiti’s How Should a Person Be? Nobody wanted it after it sold poorly in Canada, but, with some editing and an extra 8,000 words, it became a breakthrough novel at Henry Holt. Everyone geeked out and Brinda asked if that really happened. Sarah confirmed that it really did. A little bit of a book editor fantasy for you.

Inevitably, we came to the age-old question: big or little, which press fits best? Everyone seemed to agree that small presses are a good home for new authors or authors who want to try something a little different. A short story collection, for instance, might do better at a small press that can afford to take a risk. Brinda said that small presses have almost become a hunting ground for larger presses looking for emerging authors. While miming a vulture, she told us about how Farrar, Straus and Giroux bought the paperback-rights to Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle after it did well at Archipelago, a small press down the hall from the One Story office. Brinda’s vulture demonstration got us thinking. We’ve been suspicious of the hawks that live on the can factory’s fire-escape in the past, but now we’re absolutely certain: they are publishing spies!

After the panel was over, editors mixed with students, sharing glasses of wine and beer and answering questions about the business of publishing. Each day of the workshop, the possibility of publishing a book one day seems more concrete and possible. As we left the can factory and wandered out into the night, we looked up at the massive nest of sticks perched at the top of the fire-escape, and wondered if the hawks were watching.

 

One Story Workshop Day 2: Dating Your Reader

Dear Readers: This week One Story is hosting our 7th annual Summer Workshop for Writers. Our current interns, Michelle, Jess, Coryna and Kally will be chronicling each day here on our blog, giving a peek into what we’re doing at the Old American Can Factory in Brooklyn. Today’s write up is by Kally Patz and Jess Pane. Enjoy!–HT

PatrickSocks

Planet socks worn today by editor & teacher Patrick Ryan, author of THE DREAM LIFE OF ASTRONAUTS

The One Story Workshop might officially be about writing, but, really, it’s all about dating. Last night, Patrick Ryan and Will Allison encouraged writers to use their romantic know-how when contacting agents and editors. (This comforted a few, but alarmed those with memories of blind dates gone terribly awry.)

Writing, as it turns out, is no different. Hannah Tinti’s craft lecture today covered how to write strong beginnings, resonant endings, and discover the layers hidden beneath the surface of our stories. It was also about how a good first page is just like a good first date. You might want to spruce up with some solid grammar, wash off any typos, and put on something a little bit different before heading out the door. Usually, it doesn’t take Hannah more than a page to know if the relationship is going anywhere. When she’s on a date with a story, she looks for five things right away:

(1) Is the writing good on a sentence level?
(2) How fast do I get sucked in?
(3) Is there something new?
(4) What is the story?
(5) Is the writer in control?

First impressions are important, but even a good start can be overshadowed by how things end. Hannah has seen it again and again: a relationship is going well, she’s enjoying the story’s company, and it ends too soon.

“I can tell when an author was just exhausted with a piece and pressed send,” Hannah said. “When you have that thought, put it in a drawer. Let the story get some air.”

She advised that authors take some time to remember why they got involved with their story in the first place. Some writers in the audience nodded, though it was unclear whether they were thinking about an old story or an old flame.

Later in the evening, One Story welcomed literary agents Sarah Burnes, Rebecca Gradinger, and Jim Rutman to the Old American Can Factory for a discussion, moderated by Hannah (who used to work at an agency herself), on when and how a writer might need an agent.

First, they covered what an agent actually does. The agent is the intermediary between the writer’s manuscript and the published book. It’s a business relationship. They deal with the contracts, figuring out when the book is ready, and how much effort needs to go into a project before they send it out to publishers. And, yes, manuscripts almost always need work before they are sent out.

All the agents on the panel stressed that the most important thing to remember when finding an agent, is to find the right one. This is the person who you want to be in a relationship with for your career. A good agent understands your work and will fight for it. It means they will find a publisher that is also passionate about the work because the publisher should also fight for the success of a book.

While what draws an agent to a particular piece of work may be personal, the agents gave some helpful hints about what questions to ask and when is it appropriate to approach an agent.

Some questions to ask when approaching an agent:

  • What is your communication style? (Yes, your agent should always call you back.)
  • Do you do editorial work? (Some agents don’t do editorial work and ask that the writer find an outside editor.)
  • Do you sell foreign rights in-house or do you use a co-agent?
  • Does your firm work with a film agent?
  • What are some deals that you’ve done recently?

When it is appropriate to approach an agent:

  1. A writer should always review the submission guidelines on the website. Your query letter should be good. Don’t write a bad one.
  2. Send something when you have something to sell. Meaning you believe you have a finished manuscript. Beginning, middle, and end.
  3. Send something when you have something you’re proud of. For example, if you know the agent will tell you it doesn’t start until pg. 30, then work on the manuscript until it starts on pg. 1.
  4. Don’t solicit more than one agent at one literary agency. But you may solicit more than one agent if they are at different agencies.
  5. If you have a story collection, the most successful story collections have stories that have been published in known literary journals and/or the collections are theme-driven with a singular idea guiding the collection.
  6. Research the agents before you submit to them–try and find an agent who represents books similar to the one you’re trying to sell.

When it comes to rejection, just keep trying. The panel also suggested taking feedback from your rejections and consider how to possibly incorporate it into the manuscript before sending it out again. Patience is the most important part of finding an agent and publisher. If an agent is offering feedback, but still saying no, it means they really thought about your work and they would like to see it out in the literary world. Maybe it just wasn’t the right fit for them. As Sarah Burnes said, “If someone leaves the door open, it is genuine.”

Several people in the audience asked questions about numbers. How many copies does a story collection actually sell? What is the difference between publishing with a small press vs. a commercial press? Tomorrow night, on our Editor Panel, we’ll be going into more details. But for further information, Hannah recommended Lincoln Michel’s article at Electric Literature “Everything You Wanted to Know About Book Sales (But Were to Afraid to Ask).” And here is the Atlantic Monthly article, “Why American Publishing Needs Indie Presses,” mentioned by Sarah Burnes. Enjoy!

 

One Story Workshop Day 1: Subvert Expectations

Dear Readers: This week One Story is hosting our 7th annual Summer Workshop for Writers. Our current interns, Michelle, Jess, Coryna and Kally will be chronicling each day here on our blog, giving a peek into what we’re doing at the Old American Can Factory in Brooklyn. Today’s write up is by Michelle Hu. Enjoy!–HT

WSDayoneHuzzah! One Story’s seventh annual Summer Workshop for Writers has begun. Writers arrived at the Old American Can Factory and began Sunday night with a cocktail reception, filling the floor with excited and nervous conversation. The room quickly became boisterous as more names were exchanged and glasses of wine and beer were consumed. Students were introduced to the One Story team and their instructors, our own Patrick Ryan and Will Allison, in preparation for the week ahead, where they’ll be attending morning workshops, craft lectures, and a variety of panels on the business of publishing. After a friendly welcome, the students went on a tour of the can factory, and visited our office, where they heard about the creation of One Story from its co-founders, Maribeth Batcha and Hannah Tinti.

The first official day of the conference began the next day with morning workshops, where Patrick and Will led in-depth discussions on stories and novel excerpts from each student. A growing familiarity between writers became apparent in the lunch that followed.

Afterwards, students gathered for the first of the Craft Lecture series with author Myla Goldberg, who began with a brief announcement about the subjectivity of writing (even after it is published). Myla focused her lecture on creating a space that allowed for productive disagreement. Lauren Groff’s “L. DeBard and Aliette,” an unusual love story that takes place in a time of illness, became an avenue to explore how Groff develops the relationship between the writer and the reader. Students took Myla’s invitation to explore ambiguity and disagreement in the story.

Reading, a process between the writer and the reader, is not one-sided, and the goal, Myla said, “is to foster collaboration with just the right amount of information.” In the lecture, students explored the ways Groff’s intentional choices create that mutual experience. The story, written in present tense, gives the characters’ experiences a real life immediacy. The choice to divulge certain details non-sequentially, however, allows her to not alienate the reader but challenge their ability to read about difficult topics. Similarly, the exclusion of details also contributes to the collaborative experience. Myla discussed the way Groff writes about sex through exclusion and how that creates moments that are at once delicate and also provocative. In what Groff chooses to not disclose, the reader is given an active role in how they experience and what they fill the moments with.

To end the lecture, Myla told the students how she makes space for writing and gave some advice. In summary: Writing is play! She reminded us that writing began before we were given the words for it. The creation of imaginary lives and worlds started with our childhood vividness. In wide arm gestures, Myla told us that writing is as active and away from the page as acting. Get an empty room, she says, and physically act out what the character is doing, grimaces and laughter alike.

Another way of looking at writing as play is through something Myla mentioned earlier in her lecture: “Subvert the expectation.” A line that applies to the hesitation most writers feel. When beginning to write it is crucial to remember to play, to subvert, and to undo expectations. She left us all with the reminder that writing is undoing as much as it is doing. But above all else, it’s fun.

After an afternoon social break with snacks and drinks, the day ended with an informal “Meet the Instructors” conversation, moderated by One Story Publisher Maribeth Batcha. Patrick Ryan and Will Allison discussed and answered questions about how they started as writers and gave some tips for the submission process. As lightening and flood warnings briefly distracted the students, it seemed as if even the weather was fortifying the duality of a writer’s life. While some took the opportunity of the thunder storm to continue talking to their peers after the event, others hugged their bags and sprinted through the river-ed streets with their heels kicked high.

Issue #218: Queen Elizabeth
by Brad Felver

218_coverI love a good love story. But boy, are they hard to pull off! The risk is getting too sentimental, or, leaning too far in the other direction, and becoming cynical and heartless. Every once in a while, however, a writer skillfully walks the emotional line, capturing the complicated truth of what it feels like to be bound to another human soul. “Queen Elizabeth,” by Brad Felver, strikes a perfect balance between reality and hopefulness, and blossoms just like the ancient tree at the center of this heartwarming tale. A great deal of its success has to do with the authentic and complex characters Felver creates: Ruth, a mathematician who uses numbers to cope with her emotions, and Gus, an artisan woodworker, who creates beautiful, handmade desks (that will haunt the dreams of any writer who reads this story). “Queen Elizabeth” begins with a tussle over the bill on first date, and ends many years later, with Ruth and Gus sitting across from each other once again, feeling the same pull towards each other that they did when they first met. Between these two brilliant set pieces, Brad Felver skips through time, zeroing in on the briefest of moments that often define our lives. I hope that you’ll read Brad Felver’s thoughtful Q&A with us, where he discusses everything from woodworking to Euclidean planes, and even gives a glimpse into Gus and Ruth’s future, past the memorable ending of this marvelously satisfying love story.

Believe This

“You are interesting. Your imagination, your perceptions, your emotions are interesting. What is closest to you is valuable for your art. Believe this.” Those are the words carved into the tombstone of Jerome Stern, one of the greatest writing teachers I ever had. When I read this quote—which I keep over my desk—I can still hear his voice and feel his determination to inspire others.

patrickI never could have written the nine stories in my new book, The Dream Life of Astronauts (or had the courage to revisit and revise them over and over again) if it weren’t for this kind of support from people like Jerome, who not only helped my sentences get stronger on the page but showed me the importance of being a part of community that values reading and writing.

With that in mind, I’m excited to share some of my own encouragement—with YOU—in One Story’s first-ever, online Book Class: Learning from The Dream Life of Astronauts.

A book class is a private, online book club—with perks!—for both readers and writers.  Sign up today (or any time between now and August 1st) and I’ll send you a signed, first-edition copy of The Dream Life of Astronauts. In addition to the book, you’ll also gain access to a three-day, interactive class where you’ll get the chance to chat with me directly, as well as fellow readers and writers. We’ll take an intimate look at the evolution of this story collection, I’ll share my ups and downs, and I’ll also give tips that will help you start to assess your own writing, with an eye towards turning that drawer full of manuscripts into your very own book one day.

In addition, the class will feature a special, bonus story of mine called “The Real Ones,” which isn’t included in The Dream Life of Astronauts but features the same setting and atmosphere.

I hope you’ll join me. The class runs from August 4th – 7th. Sign up here, and I look forward to seeing you there!

Lena Valencia new Managing Editor of One Story

LenaOne Story is absolutely thrilled to announce that Lena Valencia will be joining us as our new Managing Editor.

Lena Valencia has held positions at A Public Space and BOMB Magazine, and served as a bookseller and events coordinator at The powerHouse Arena. Her writing has appeared in StoryChordBOMBThe Masters Review, and elsewhere. She received her MFA in Fiction from The New School and hosts the HiFi Reading Series in Manhattan. You can find her on Twitter at @lenavee.

Please join us in welcoming Lena to the One Story family!!